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Bibliography Info

Books

Book By One Author

Kissinger, Henry. White House Years. Boston: Penguin Books, 1979.

Book By Two Authors

If there are two authors, retain the comma before “and” (e.g., Lyons, J., and Jordan, S.). Authors' names are listed in the alphabetical order. Full first names can be used or just the first initials.

Emmerson, John, and Holland, James. The Eagle and the Rising Sun: America and Japan in the Twentieth Century. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1988.

Book By Three Or More Authors

Boffey, Philip M., et al. Claiming the Heavens: Complete Guide to the Star War Debate. New York: Times Publishers, 1988.

Book With No Author

Managing Stress from Morning to Night. Alexandria: Time-Life, 1987.

 

Book With An Editor

Steen, Lynn Arthur, ed. Mathematics Tomorrow. New York: Springer Verlag, 1981.

Book In A Series

The title of the series follows the title of the book.

Sandberg, Peter Lars. Dwight D. Eisenhower. World Leaders, Past and Present. New York: Chelsea, 1986.

 


Reference Books

Encyclopedia

If the article is signed, use the following format:

Pearson, Norman Holmes. “American Literature.” Encyclopedia Americana. 1999.

 

Use the following format if the article is unsigned:

“Tornado.” The World Book Encyclopedia. 1999.

 

Electronic Sources

CD ROM

Encarta

“Title.” Microsoft Encarta 98 Encyclopedia. CD-ROM. Microsoft, 1993-1997.

Groliers Encyclopedia On The Web

Pasquier, Roger F., “Owl.” Encyclopedia Americana Online. Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia Online. Online. Grolier, Inc. <http://ea.grolier.com> 5 Apr. 2001.

Internet

Author (if available). “Title of Work.” Source. Date of original source. Online. Internet.

<Electronic address or URL> Date of access.

 

Geisler, Norman. “10 Reasons for Voluntary School Prayer.” The Shreveport Humanist

Bulletin. August 1995. Online. Internet.

 

<http://www.softdisk.com/shume/pray1.html> 8 May 2003.

 

 


Sample Bibliography:

Bibliography

Angier, Natalie. "Chemists Learn Why Vegetables are Good for You." New York Times 13 Apr. 1993, late ed.: C1. New York Times Ondisc. CD-ROM. UMI-Proquest. Oct. 1993.

Anzaldua, Gloria. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. San Francisco: Spinsters/ Aunt Lute, 1987.

Astin, Alexander W. Achieving Educational Excellence. Washington: Jossey-Bass, 1985.

Burka, Lauren P. "A Hypertext History of Multi-User Dimensions." MUD History. URL: <http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/lpb/mud-history.html> 5 Dec 1994.

Metheny, N.M., and W. D. Snively. Nurses' Handbook of Fluid Balance. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1967.

"Money." Compton's Precyclopedia. 1977 ed., X, 80-91.

Pikarsky, M. and Christensen, D. Urban Transportation Policy and Management. Boston: D.C. Heath, 1976.

 

Rules

  1. Write in alphabetical order.
  2. Within a single citation, if there are two or more authors – alphabetize them.
  3. Double space.
  4. Watch punctuation carefully.
  5. Use italics for names of books and articles for encyclopedias.
  6. Use correct format depending on book, encyclopedia article or website.
  7. Second, third and so on lines are always indented 5 spaces (1 tab).
  8. For each source, use the city closest to where you live if more than one is listed.
  9. Use the most recent publication edition date.
  10. After an editor’s name write         ed.   See above example: Book with an editor

 

 

 

 

 

Citations

  1. When quoting a book word for word in your paper, write the authors name in parentheses after the sentence with a period following outside of the parentheses.

 

 

Example:

The sculpture entitled Family, given to the college in 1991 and permanently exhibited in the college's Woodland Street lobby, was carved from an enormous cherry tree that grew in the sculptor's back yard (Rosen).

 

Outline Format:

Title

I. Introduction

A. State purpose of this paper

B. Give interesting information about your topic without stating information that you will include later

II. Body of Research Paper

A. First Topic

1. First supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

2. Second supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

3. Third supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

B. Second Topic

1. First supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

2. Second supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

3. Third supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

C. Third Topic

1. First supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

2. Second supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

3. Third supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

D. Fourth Topic

1. First supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

2. Second supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

3. Third supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

E. Fifth Topic

1. First supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

2. Second supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

3. Third supporting information or detail for the sub-topic

III. Conclusion

A. Wrap up paper briefly

B. Add any additional information here

 

Do NOT use words like I, me, I like, very interesting or SUBJECTIVE, PERSONAL comments         


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