TeacherWeb

“… and he strode down the street with his mouth full of harmony and his soul full of gratitude.” (Twain. p20-21.)

turnerd@seekonk.k12.School Link
 
8th Grade Orientation
8th Grade Orientation TheArt Of Education Text Complexity Common Core SWBAT
8th Grade Orientation The Essential Question Keeping Your Journal WritingTips&Technology
Vocabulary Exercises Reading/Vocab Guides
A. SeptemberOctober HomeworkClasswork Virtual BulletinBoard
B. NovemberDecember HomeworkClasswork Virtual BulletinBoard
C. January&February HomeworkClasswork Virtual BulletinBoard
D. MarchAprilMay HomeworkClasswork Virtual Bulletinboard
1a Summer Reading
1b Video/URL Choices: Learning ABILITIES
2a Informational Texts: Long Island Express/ Hurricane '38 & Hurricane Carol 1954
2b Informational Texts Complex Themes WIZARD OF OZ L.FrankBaum vs. MGM American FairyTale
3 Informational Texts Short Stories/Novellas Washington Irving and SLEEPY HOLLOW Vocab&Text Complexity
4 DELIGHT SONG SpiritWeek Play, Artifact &Genealogy/FamilyTree
5 Informational Texts Period Literature UK Charles Dickens CHRISTMAS CAROL Protagonist Profile Theme Complexity
6a Informational Texts Creation of Music Language of Literature
6b Informational Texts Drama LION KING Complex Themes &Visual Imagery
7 Informational Texts U.S.History mid 1800's Period Literature USA MarkTwain SLClemens TOM SAWYER
Seekonk History
URL RESEARCH SeekonkBicentennial RedSox Centennial
Handouts Info Texts
Handouts Media/Film
Handouts Literature
Handouts Poetry
Handouts Grammar
Handouts Composition
Handouts "READING" Pers Learning Projects HANDMADE BOOKS 2&3D SCHEMATICS
Resource MayJun PersLearningProj EarthDay Ecology WhaleWatch&MobyDick
Resource SeptJun Diversity: English Science Social Studies Math SpecialEducation Collaboration
Resource SeptJun Informational Texts Primary Sources Civics&Citizenship Veteran's Day, Nov.11: WorldWar I Dec.Truce
Resource Poet/Poem a Day Poetry&PoeticLanguage Ballads, Odes, Elegies, Petrach's Sonnet, and Shakespeare's Sonnet
Research&Technology DIARY of ANNE FRANK & PLACE at the TABLE ...I NEVER SAW ANOTHER BUTTERFLY
URL RESEARCH PrimarySourceDoc LibraryOfCongress
URL RESEARCH Literature&Poetry Writing&Media
VIDEO&PHOTOGRAPHY Rhetoric, Speeches, and Our Collective Past
VIDEO&PHOTOGRAPHY Poetry Music & the SpokenWord
VIDEO&PHOTOGRAPHY Fiction, Drama & History
VIDEO&PHOTOGRAPHY Writing Reading & Documentary
JPEG Binding Books
JPEG LiteraryTerms
JPEG TraditionalLiterature
QuickTime Movies Dr.KevinM.Hurley Middle School
PhotoJournal Autobio



Top Divider

 

7 Informational Texts U.S.History mid 1800's Period Literature USA MarkTwain SLClemens TOM SAWYER

To educators and to all who choose to use my photographs, documents and information that are posted on this site - Should you choose to use these materials in your classroom or for any other educational purpose, please remember not only to cite this website as your resource, but also to request permission to use these documents. Documents, images, and information used for educational purposes has been cited. Nothing can be sold. Teach your students and/or remember the etiquette and importance of citing that which does not belong to you. Requesting permission is as easy as clicking on the mail icon at the top of the page and sending your request to me via email.  Thank you.


Why we do what we do:
We continue to build on your elementary school skills and strategies, when we show you how these skills and strategies are the foundation for the more difficult high school skills and strategies you are learning.  This is the year to practice, so you are prepared for any high school. 


The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is period literature.  The PBS documentary Mark Twain is an example of an informational film/text. You are not only expected to read the novel, but also to synthesize information from the PBS documentary -  new Common Core Standards!  You are expected to read each night, take notes on the reading and prepare questions for class.   You will not understand everything!  Develop questions for class discussion and ask those questions during class.

Oftentimes you will be allowed to use your notes during chapter quizzes.  Take notes and bring your notes to class.  You are practicing independent, self-directed skills and strategies as you continue to prepare for high school. 

Third and fourth quarters are a time to use the skills and strategies you have practiced all year.  Develop study groups, come in for extra help, and most importantly prepare for class by doing your homework!!!




This page is updated and will continue to be undated as needed.


1-stream.jpg Scroll down and discover:
  • Student Guides
  • Reading Resources
  •  "Research is formalized curiosity. It is poking and prying with a purpose." Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road
  • Samuel Clemens: Pseudonym Mark Twain
  • Class Notes by Chapter
  • Writing Resources
  • Skills and Strategies
  • Ms. Laster's lesson


Random thoughts:

"I never had any large respect for good spelling. That is my feeling yet. Before the spelling-book came with its arbitrary forms, men unconsciously revealed shades of their characters and also added enlightening shades of expression to what they wrote by their spelling, and so it is possible that the spelling-book has been a doubtful benevolence to us."


(Mark Twain, Autobiography)




1-steamboat.jpg Student Guides







More Resources: 

1a. Mark Twain the American Humorist URL Resources: Scroll down to Samuel Clemens: Pseudonym Mark Twain





4 . Resource: PBS Mark Twain
a. PBS Mark Twain Scrapbook: http://www.pbs.org/marktwain/
  • DVD Chapter 1. Introduction [16:02]
  • DVD Chapter 2. Safe Water [11:43]
  • DVD Chapter 7. Old Voices [13:45]
  • DVD Chapter 8. All Right Then, I'll Go to Hell [25:26] 
             Note: Chapter 8 defines and contextualizes the historical connotations and denotations.


a. Focus: Biography 
Day One Lesson Plan [PDF]

b. Focus: Culture and History 
Day Two Lesson Plan [PDF]

c. Focus: Narrative and Point of View 
Day Three Lesson Plan [PDF]

d. Focus: Characters 
Day Four Lesson Plan [PDF]

e. Focus: Figurative Language 
Day Five Lesson Plan [PDF]

f. Focus: Symbols
 Day Six Lesson Plan [PDF]

g. Focus: Character Development
 Day Seven Lesson Plan [PDF]

h. Focus: The Plot Unfolds
 Day Eight Lesson Plan [PDF]

i. Focus: Themes of the Novel
 Day Nine Lesson Plan [PDF]

j. Focus: What Makes a Book Great? 
Day Ten Lesson Plan [PDF]

Discussion Questions: http://www.neabigread.org/books/theadventuresoftomsawyer/readers-guide/discussion-questions/



1-steamboat.jpg Reading Resources

1. Online Unabridged Novel: 
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain   http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html

MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia
        Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<



2.  iTunes Free download: Lit2Go series:  Audio Unabridged Novel 

You can download the audio-novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and listen to it while you read. The audio is divided chapter by chapter. This might be helpful knowing you will be reading one or two chapters each night.  

or use Lit2Go online to read and listen to each chapter:  

http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/34/the-adventures-of-tom-sawyer/

or use Lit2Go to research basic facts about Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens) 

http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/authors/5/mark-twain/

 

3. Table of Contents and MLA Citation of the original novel:

MLA Citation Hardcopy:

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.


The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

By Mark Twain

Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Co., 1876

Preface

Chapter 1 -- Y-o-u-u Tom -- Aunt Polly Decides Upon her Duty -- Tom Practices Music -- The Challenge -- A Private Entrance

Chapter 2 -- Strong Temptations -- Strategic Movements -- The Innocents Beguiled

Chapter 3 -- Tom as a General -- Triumph and Reward -- Dismal Felicity -- Commission and Omission

Chapter 4 -- Mental Acrobatics -- Attending Sunday-School -- The Superintendent -- "Showing off" -- Tom Lionized

Chapter 5 -- A Useful Minister -- In Church -- The Climax

Chapter 6 -- Self-Examination -- Dentistry -- The Midnight Charm -- Witches and Devils -- Cautious Approaches -- Happy Hours

Chapter 7 -- A Treaty Entered Into -- Early Lessons -- A Mistake Made

Chapter 8 -- Tom Decides on his Course -- Old Scenes Re-enacted

Chapter 9 -- A Solemn Situation -- Grave Subjects Introduced -- Injun Joe Explains

Chapter 10 -- The Solemn Oath -- Terror Brings Repentance -- Mental Punishment

Chapter 11 -- Muff Potter Comes Himself -- Tom's Conscience at Work

Chapter 12 -- Tom Shows his Generosity -- Aunt Polly Weakens

Chapter 13 -- The Young Pirates -- Going to the Rendezvous -- The Camp-Fire Talk

Chapter 14 -- Camp-Life -- A Sensation -- Tom Steals Away from Camp

Chapter 15 -- Tom Reconnoiters -- Learns the Situation -- Report at Camp

Chapter 16 -- A Day's Amusements -- Tom Reveals a Secret -- The Pirates take a Lesson -- A Night Surprise -- An Indian War

Chapter 17 -- Memories of the Lost Heroes -- The Point in Tom's Secret

Chapter 18 -- Tom's Feelings Investigated -- Wonderful Dream -- Becky Thatcher Overshadowed -- Tom Becomes Jealous -- Black Revenge

Chapter 19 -- Tom Tells the Truth

Chapter 20 -- Becky in a Dilemma -- Tom's Nobility Asserts Itself

Chapter 21 -- Youthful Eloquence -- Compositions by the Young Ladies -- A Lengthy Vision -- The Boy's Vengeance Satisfied

Chapter 22 -- Tom's Confidence Betrayed -- Expects Signal Punishment

Chapter 23 -- Old Muff's Friends -- Muff Potter in Court -- Muff Potter Saved

Chapter 24 -- Tom as the Village Hero -- Days of Splendor and Nights of Horror -- Pursuit of Injun Joe

Chapter 25 -- About Kings and Diamonds -- Search for the Treasure -- Dead People and Ghosts

Chapter 26 -- The Haunted House -- Sleepy Ghosts -- A Box of Gold -- Bitter Luck

Chapter 27 -- Doubts to be Settled -- The Young Detectives

Chapter 28 -- An Attempt at No. Two -- Huck Mounts Guard

Chapter 29 -- The Picnic -- Muck on Injun Joe's Track -- The "Revenge" Job -- Aid for the Widow

Chapter 30 -- The Welchman Reports -- Huck Under Fire -- The Story Circulated -- A New Sensation -- Hope Giving Way to Despair

Chapter 31 -- An Exploring Expedition -- Trouble Commences -- Lost in the Cave -- Total Darkness -- Found but not Saved

Chapter 32 -- Tom tells the Story of their Escape -- Tom's Enemy in Safe Quarters

Chapter 33 -- The Fate of Injun Joe -- Huck and Tom Compare Notes -- An Expedition to the Cave -- Protection Against Ghosts -- "An Awful Snug Place" -- A Reception at the Widow Douglas's

Chapter 34 -- Springing a Secret -- Mr. Jones' Surprise a Failure

Chapter 35 -- A New Order of Things -- Poor Huck -- New Adventures Planned

Chapter 36 – Conclusion

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.

The New York TImes Link, 

 

Practicing Annotated Note-taking Strategies , will provide you with note-taking strategies discussed during class.


Informational Texts and Literature:
The introduction to the Tom Sawyer unit addresses not only the historical period, but also the period vocabulary of the times. Samuel Langhorne Clemens and his “alter-ego,” Mark Twain, are part of the literary landscape in the United States. This man; this author wrote fearlessly about “space and race (PBS Mark Twain).

 
Resource: PBS Mark Twain
PBS Mark Twain Scrapbook: http://www.pbs.org/marktwain/
Note: This PBS/Ken Burns documentary is in the Netflix collection.
  • DVD Chapter 1. Introduction [16:02]
  • DVD Chapter 2. Safe Water [11:43]
  • DVD Chapter 7. Old Voices [13:45]
  • DVD Chapter 8. All Right Then, I'll Go to Hell [25:26] 
             Note: Chapter 8 defines and contextualizes the historical connotations and denotations.






1-steamboat.jpg Research: social, cultural and political climate
"Research is formalized curiosity.  It is poking and prying with a purpose." Zora Neale Hurston

Tom Sawyer Guiding Questions:
  • How can reading about the Civil War Era inform our understanding of Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn, Aunt Polly, Muff Potter, Injun Joe, St. Petersburg etc.?
  • How does the Civil War period in which Samuel Langhorne Clemens lived affect the conclusions drawn about his choice of topics, themes, and settings?
  • How does Samuel Langhorne Clemens draw explicit references to elements of social, cultural, and historical context in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer?
  • How can The Adventures of Tom Sawyer help us define the greater good in the post Civil War society circa 1860/70; today’s society? What is the “greater good”?
  • How are visual images (line, color, shape, shadow, light, close-ups, wide-angle, etc.) and audio elements used in film to tell the story? (2008 Tom and Huck)


c. The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854












Native Americans:

11. The Homestead Act May 20, 1862 (Congressional Act signed by President Lincoln)







Medicine:



Children at Play:



 

 1-steamboat.jpg  Samuel Langhorn Clemens: Pseudonym - Mark Twain



Mark Twain or Samuel Langhorne Clemens?





Mark Twain - Mini Biography




1. Samuel Langhorne Clemens: Who is this man???

a. Samuel Langhorne Clemens: Samuel Langhorne Clemens - PBS biography
Historical, social, and cultural climate of Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and The Adventures of Huckleberry FInn. 

b. Samuel Langhorne Clemens: Interactive Scrapbook PBS




2. Resource: PBS Mark Twain (Ken Burns)

PBS Mark Twain Scrapbook: http://www.pbs.org/marktwain/
Note: This PBS/Ken Burns documentary is in the Netflix collection.
  • DVD Chapter 1. Introduction [16:02]
  • DVD Chapter 2. Safe Water [11:43]
  • DVD Chapter 7. Old Voices [13:45]
  • DVD Chapter 8. All Right Then, I'll Go to Hell [25:26] 
             Note: Chapter 8 defines and contextualizes the historical connotations and denotations.





3. Thomas Edison Film. 1909
Samuel Langhorne Clemens and his family at Stormfield, Connecticut:  Historical fIlm footage taken by Thomas Edison. (Edison FIlm. 1909.)




4. Mark Twain and His times - source: University of VIrginia


5. Official Website for Mark Twain


6. Mark Twain House - Connecticut


7. The Mighty Mississippi
  
"The face of the water, in time, became a wonderful book--a book that was a dead language to the uneducated passenger, but which told its mind to me without reserve, delivering its most cherished secrets as clearly as if it uttered them with a voice. And it was not a book to be read once and thrown aside, for it had a new story to tell every day. Throughout the long twelve hundred miles there was never a page that was void of interest, never one that you could leave unread without loss, never one that you would want to skip, thinking you could find higher enjoyment in some other thing. There never was so wonderful a book written by man; never one whose interest was so absorbing, so unflagging, so sparklingly renewed with every reperusal. The passenger who could not read it was charmed with a peculiar sort of faint dimple on its surface (on the rare occasions when he did not overlook it altogether); but to the pilot that was an italicized passage; indeed, it was more than that, it was a legend of the largest capitals, with a string of shouting exclamation points at the end of it, for it meant that a wreck or a rock was buried there that could tear the life out of the strongest vessel that ever floated. It is the faintest and simplest expression the water ever makes, and the most hideous to a pilot's eye. In truth, the passenger who could not read this book saw nothing but all manner of pretty pictures in it, painted by the sun and shaded by the clouds, whereas to the trained eye these were not pictures at all, but the grimmest and most dread-earnest of reading matter."  (Mark Twain: Two Views of the Mississippi. Chapter 9: Continued Perplexities. 1883.)

Twain, Mark. Life on the Mississippi RIver. New York: Harper Brothers Publishing. 1906. Print.

Online Resource: http://myweb.wvnet.edu/~jelkins/orientation/legalmind/twain.html
Online Resource with original illustrations: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/245/245-h/245-h.htm#linkc9

Guiding Question: Who is Samuel Langhorne Clemens and Mark Twain:

State Historical Society of Missouri

History and Legacy of Mark Twain in Elmira

Mark Twain Papers and Prjects: UC at Berkley

Mark Twain


Controversy:

Teaching Channel "Socratic Seminar: N-word" https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teaching-the-n-word

CBS News: 

Education at its best presents differing points of view and many resources
Censorship, First Amendment, and period language
1. Define "censorship".

2. First Amendment:
"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."
3.

How does Samuel Langhorne Clemens draw explicit references to elements of social, cultural, and historical context in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer? Why is this important to us - a 21st century audience?






1-steamboat.jpg  Class Notes


1-stream.jpg Chapter 1

Ch 1 - Y-o-u-u Tom - Aunt Polly Decides Upon her Duty - Tom Practices Music - The Challenge - A Private Entrance

Online Unabridged etext: 
University of Virginia unabridged etext, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer:  http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html
Note:  The University of VIrginia unabridged etext, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, includes page numbers.



MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia
        Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<



Hardcopy Novel:

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel: 
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom SawyerHartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.

Preface
Chapter 1 Vocabulary: 

  • spectacles--eyeglasses
  • conscience—the ability to recognize right from wrong
  • vanity—extreme pride in one’s ability, possessions, or appearance
  • vexed—annoyed or bothered by something
  • sagacity—using wisdom or good judgment
  • lapels—the front part of a garment (usually a coat) which is a continuation of the collar
  • diligence—constant effort used to accomplish a task
  • roundabout—not going about something in a direct manner; a coat/jacket/cloak used for general purposes
  • ambuscade—a trap; a surprise attack
  • guile—trickery; deceit; duplicity; lying
  • bona fide—performed in good faith; genuine; authentic
  • subtle—not blatant or obvious
  • deduce—to derive a conclusion by reasoning
  • diffident—lacking confidence in oneself; unsure

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.



Online: 

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain - 


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<


MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel: 
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom SawyerHartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.


1-stream.jpg  Chapter 2


Chapter 2 -- Strong Temptations -- Strategic Movements -- The Innocents Beguiled

Chapter 2 Vocabulary:

  • beguiled - deceived; deluded; tricked
  • reluctance—unwillingness
  • alacrity—cheerfulness; willingness; eager
  • delectable—greatly pleasing; delightful; enjoyable
  • reposeful—calm; peaceful
  • melancholy—sadness; depression; gloominess
  • mulatto—persons of mixed parentage
  • taw—a large fancy marble for shooting; the line from which a player shoots in marbles
  • inspiration—a sudden bright idea or thought
  • tranquility—peacefulness
  • ridicule—to make fun of something or someone
  • anticipation—eagerly awaiting an event or occasion
  • melodious—nice and pleasant to hear
  • starboard—the right hand side of a ship as one faces forward
  • ponderously—ungracefully; laboriously
  • jeer—mock; taunt; abuse openly
  • dilapidated—fallen into a state of disrepair; broken-down; in need of repair
  • obliged—obligated; indebted to; mandatory
  • wended—proceeded; went along; traveled

     

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.



Pretending to be the Big Missouri:
"Ben's gait was the hop-skip-and-jump -- proof enough that his heart was light and his anticipations high. He was eating an apple, and giving a long, melodious whoop, at intervals, followed by a deep-toned ding-dong-dong, ding-dong-dong, for he was personating a steamboat. As he drew near, he slackened speed, took the middle of the street, leaned far over to star-board and rounded to ponderously and with laborious pomp and circumstance -- for he was personating the Big Missouri, and considered himself to be drawing nine feet of water. He was boat and captain and engine-bells combined, so he had to imagine himself standing on his own hurricane-deck giving the orders and executing them:..." (p. 30)

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia
        Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<



Online:

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain -


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.


 
1-stream.jpg Chapter 3

Chapter 3 -- Tom as a General -- Triumph and Reward -- Dismal Felicity -- Commission and Omission

 Chapter 3 Vocabulary:

  • balmy—mild and pleasant
  • Intrepid—resolutely courageous, fearless, bold
  • diluted—watered down, made weak
  • virtuous—possessing the qualities of moral excellence
  • clods—lumps of clay or earth
  • eminence—a position of great distinction or superiority
  • evanescence—vanishing or likely to vanish; fleeting
  • furtive—sneaky, sly, stealthy
  • grotesque—distorted; strange; bizarre
  • pliant—easily bent; flexible; easily persuaded
  • exultation—joy, triumph, great happiness
  • perplexed—puzzled, confused
  • audacious—fearlessly daring, bold, insolent
  • morosely—gloomy, depressed, sullen, melancholy
  • beseeching—plead, beg, request earnestly
  • desolate - deserted, uninhabited; gloomy, dreary, dismal
  • dismal - gloomy, depressing, dreary
  • felicity - great happiness, bliss
  • blighted - declined, decayed, ruined, destroyed
  • martyr - one who sacrifices something very important in order to stand up for one's beliefs or principles

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.



Chapter 3 - Play: Making Connections/Supplemental Writing

aphotjautobiodstplayhouse.jpg 

Play - Defined and Described Metaphorically
Draft your play narrative.


Write your draft. After you complete your draft, use the following PDF file to revise your draft. 
http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/narrative-play-artifact-weather.pdf

Use the following PDF file to complete the final revision.
http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/rubric-narrative-play.pdf


1. The concept is simple: SWBAT go outside and play for two hours:)

2. Restrictions: 
a. No technology of any kind - examples: no cell phones, ipods, mp3 players, ipads, tablets, video games, etc
b. No motorized toys and/or vehicles - dirt bikes, remote control cars and/or air planes, paintball guns
c. Do not use this two-hour play time on October 31st - Halloween does not count:(

3. Have your parents/guardians sign your journal/planner to verify that you played for the full two hours. 
a. Use this experience to draft your personal definition of "play."
b. Use this experience to describe how you spent your time, but your description is symbolic and written as an extended metaphor
c. Craft/draft descriptive writing that includes sensory information, adjectives, imagery, and literary terms, like metaphors and symbols. 


Online:

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain -


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.


Enrichment:
Note: We took time to play: cat's cradle" and old 19th century game:)  
Cat's Cradle - a 19th century child's game played with the string a child carried around in his/her pocket pocket:
http://www.ifyoulovetoread.com/book/chten_cats1105.htm


We also compared the game to the refrain in Harry Chapin's folk rock,  "Cat's In the Cradle" lyrics: How would Tom and Huck react/understand the "Cat's In the Cradle" lyrics based on their life experiences?
 
Copyright information: Writer(s): Sandy Chapin, Harry F. Chapin, Copyright: Story Songs Ltd.. 1974 folk rock

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/harrychapin/catsinthecradle.html and http://www.lyricsdepot.com/harry-chapin/cats-in-the-cradle.html


Note: How do you change this information into a MLA citation???







 

1-stream.jpg Chapters 4 and 5

Chapter 4 -- Mental Acrobatics -- Attending Sunday-School -- The Superintendent -- "Showing off" -- Tom Lionize

Chapter 5 -- A Useful Minister -- In Church -- The Climax

Chapters 4, 5 and 6 Vocabulary: 

  • tranquil - very calm, quiet; free from disturbance
  • benediction—a blessing given at the end of a religious service
  • prospective—looked forward to as likely or promised; probable; expected
  • convulsion—a violent shaking
  • grandeur—the quality of being grand; splendor; magnificent
  • contrived—planned; devised
  • scarify—to mark, damage or scar
  • diligently—showing painstaking effort; industriously; carefully
  • disconcerted—upset; perturbed
  • tallow—hard fat rendered from sheep or cattle used to make soap, candles, and lubricants
  • edifice—a large, impressive building or structure
  • éclat—a brilliant success; fame, glory; applause, approval
  • mien—way of acting or looking; demeanor; bearing
  • prodigious—very great; huge; vast
  • awe—a feeling of wonder or reverence; in respect of
  • prodigy—a person endowed with amazing talent, brilliance, etc.
  • dupe—a person easily deceived or tricked
  • wily—using tricks to deceive; crafty; cunning
  • venerable—worthy of respect
  • laggard—slow; backward; lagging; someone who loiters
  • predestined—destiny; fate; decided beforehand
  • pathos—a quality that evokes sadness or pity
  • odious—very displeasing; hateful; offensive
  • sash—frame for the glass of a window; part of a window that can be moved to open or close a window
  • mortified—wound the feelings of; make to feel ashamed ; humiliate
  • expectorate—to cough up and spit out
  • pariah—any person or animal generally despised; an outcast
  • animosity—hostile feelings; dislike
  • caricature—imitation of something by ridiculous exaggeration
  • derrick—a machine with a long arm used to lift something
  • portentous—indicating evil to come; ominous; threatening
  • ostentation—showing off; display intended to impress others

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.


Online:

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain -


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.


1-stream.jpg Chapter 6

Ch 6 - Self-Examination - Dentistry - Midnight Charm - Witches and Devils - Cautious Approaches - Happy Hours

Chapters 4, 5 and 6 Vocabulary: 

  • tranquil - very calm, quiet; free from disturbance
  • benediction—a blessing given at the end of a religious service
  • prospective—looked forward to as likely or promised; probable; expected
  • convulsion—a violent shaking
  • grandeur—the quality of being grand; splendor; magnificent
  • contrived—planned; devised
  • scarify—to mark, damage or scar
  • diligently—showing painstaking effort; industriously; carefully
  • disconcerted—upset; perturbed
  • tallow—hard fat rendered from sheep or cattle used to make soap, candles, and lubricants
  • edifice—a large, impressive building or structure
  • éclat—a brilliant success; fame, glory; applause, approval
  • mien—way of acting or looking; demeanor; bearing
  • prodigious—very great; huge; vast
  • awe—a feeling of wonder or reverence; in respect of
  • prodigy—a person endowed with amazing talent, brilliance, etc.
  • dupe—a person easily deceived or tricked
  • wily—using tricks to deceive; crafty; cunning
  • venerable—worthy of respect
  • laggard—slow; backward; lagging; someone who loiters
  • predestined—destiny; fate; decided beforehand
  • pathos—a quality that evokes sadness or pity
  • odious—very displeasing; hateful; offensive
  • sash—frame for the glass of a window; part of a window that can be moved to open or close a window
  • mortified—wound the feelings of; make to feel ashamed ; humiliate
  • expectorate—to cough up and spit out
  • pariah—any person or animal generally despised; an outcast
  • animosity—hostile feelings; dislike
  • caricature—imitation of something by ridiculous exaggeration
  • derrick—a machine with a long arm used to lift something
  • portentous—indicating evil to come; ominous; threatening
  • ostentation—showing off; display intended to impress others

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.

Chapter 6 Journal Entries

In Chapter Six, what character are we introduced to and what do we learn about the character? Why do all the boys envy him?

In Chapter Six, take notes on the superstitions that Tom and Huck talk about. Why do the children in St. Petersburg rely on superstitions? Do superstitions have a purpose in childhood?

Online:

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain -


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.
 

1-stream.jpg Chapter 7

Chapter 7 -- A Treaty Entered Into -- Early Lessons -- A Mistake Made

Chapters 7 & 8 Vocabulary:

  • wane - lose size; gradually become smaller
  • bliss—great happiness or delight; joy; ecstasy
  • andiron—a pair of metal supports for wood in a fireplace; firedog
  • upbraid—find fault with; blame; reprove
  • frivolity—silly behavior
  • ecstasy—condition of very great joy
  • cogitating—consider with care; pondering; thinking about deeply
  • incantations—set of words spoken as a magic charm or to cast a magic spell
  • accouterments—clothes, outfit; a soldier’s gear


1-stream.jpg  Chapter 8


Chapter 8 -- Tom Decides on his Course -- Old Scenes Re-enacted

Chapters 7 & 8 Vocabulary:

  • wane - lose size; gradually become smaller
  • bliss—great happiness or delight; joy; ecstasy
  • andiron—a pair of metal supports for wood in a fireplace; firedog
  • upbraid—find fault with; blame; reprove
  • frivolity—silly behavior
  • ecstasy—condition of very great joy
  • cogitating—consider with care; pondering; thinking about deeply
  • incantations—set of words spoken as a magic charm or to cast a magic spell
  • accouterments—clothes, outfit; a soldier’s gear

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.



Chapter 7 and 8 Journal Entries:

In Chapter Seven, identify three examples of imagery (this could be just a whole paragraph).  Use supporting evidence from the passage to explain the sensory information identified in each passage.

In Chapter Seven, refer to the dialogue between Tom and Joe Thatcher.  Refer to the dialogue between Tom and Becky Thatcher.  Identify examples of dialect in each of these passages of dialogue.

In Chapter Seven, take notes on the short-lived relationship between Tom Sawyer and Becky Thatcher. What does their relationship reveal about the maturity and lack of maturity of Tom Sawyer?  Use supporting evidence in your explanation.

In Chapter Eight, why is Tom so disappointed when he realizes the superstition fails?   What superstition fails him?



Online:

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain -


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.




1-stream.jpg Chapters 9 and 10


Chapter 9 -- A Solemn Situation -- Grave Subjects Introduced -- Injun Joe Explains

Chapter 10 -- The Solemn Oath -- Terror Brings Repentance -- Mental Punishment

Chapters 9 & 10 Vocabulary:

  • perceptible—noticeable
  • ingenuity—cleverness
  • ghastly—horrible; terrifying
  • solemnity/solemn—very serious; sacred
  • ensconced—settled securely
  • oppressive—causing worry or creating a burden
  • innumerable—too many to be counted
  • monotonous—lacking variety
  • pallid—pale; lacking color
  • vagrant—roaming from one place to another without a job
  • ruffian—a lawless, rowdy person
  • stolid—dull; slow-witted
  • dire—dreadful or terrible
  • sublimity—lofty excellence; grandeur; majesty
  • fetters—chains or ropes used to prevent escape
  • lugubrious—mournful; dejected
  • facility—ease in doing something
  • flogged—beaten, whipped
  • colossal—huge; great in scope

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.




What are Implicit Reading Skills? -  The following passage is from Chapter 10, page 58 in the novel we are using in class.   
  • Why is the asterisk (*) included at the end of the following line in the middle of page 58?
"Oh, lordy, I'm thankful!" whispered Tom. "I know his voice. It's Bull Harbison." *   
  • When an asterisk (*) is included in the text, why is it wise to take a minute and go to the bottom of the page to read the information: for example, the following note found at the bottom of page 58?
Note: * If Mr. Harbison had owned a slave named Bull, Tom would have spoken of him as "Harbison's Bull," but a son or a dog of that name was "Bull Harbison."


Re-read the following line from page 58: "Oh, lordy, I'm thankful!" whispered Tom. "I know his voice. It's Bull Harbison." *
  • What are the words in: "Oh, lordy, I'm thankful!" whispered Tom. "I know his voice. It's Bull Harbison." * - that makes us stop and use our implicit reading skills?    (thankful, whispered, his voice, Bull Harbison)
  • What do we learn about Mark Twain's story from these words:  thankful, whispered, his voice, and Bull Harbison?
  • What do we learn about the protagonist, Tom Sawyer,  from these words:  thankful, whispered, his voice, and Bull Harbison?
  • What do we learn about the author, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, from these words:  thankful, whispered, his voice, and Bull Harbison?

Now read the note at the bottom of page 58.  I have included it for your convenience.

Note: * If Mr. Harbison had owned a slave named Bull, Tom would have spoken of him as "Harbison's Bull," but a son or a dog of that name was "Bull Harbison."
  • Notice the word slave.
  • What do we need to know to continue.   Think like a detective trying to solve a mystery.  (Can you use you prior knowledge to figure out when in the history of the United Sates the setting of this story took place?  Once you figure out a general time period, can you use your prior knowledge to figure out what proclamation Abraham Lincoln signed that made a profound effect on the "Peculiar Institution" of slavery?
  • At this point can you make a connection between the fictional story and the non fictional history? Once you use your prior knowledge to complete your detective investigation, you can continue making connections - using your implicit reading skills - to figure out the following questions.
  • What do we learn about the social climate of the United States of America from the word  slave?
  • What do we learn about Tom's attitude about the social climate at this time period in the United States of America from the word  slave?
  • What do we learn about Tom's attitude about the social climate at this time period in the United States of America from the word  whispered?
  • What do we learn about Tom's attitude about the social climate at this time period in the United States of America from the phrase  his voice?
  • What do we learn about Tom's attitude about the social climate at this time period in the United States of America from the fact that he used the name Bull Harbinson and not Harbinson's Bull?
  • What do we learn about Samuel Langhorne Clemes' struggle with the "Peculiar Institution" at this time period in the United States of America from the word  slave?  (You will need your notes about Samuel Langhorne Clemens to answer this questions.)

Implicit Reading is a contact sport and if you do not "contact" your prior knowledge and apply everything you know to what you read and then verify some things you are not sure of, then you will read words and a story, but not the novel.



Chapter 10 Journal Entries:
In Chapter 10, Tom and Huck decide not to tell the sheriff they witnessed Injun Joe murder Doc Robinson. Explain why. Identify the supporting evidence.
 
Refer to Chapter 10. What does the dialogue between Tom and Huck reveal about the two characters and the differences in lifestyles they lead?
 
In previous chapters, we learn that the boys in St. Petersburg idolize Huck Finn. Identify supporting evidence in Chapter 10 to prove Huck admires Tom.
 


Online:

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain -


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.




1-stream.jpg Chapter 11 and 12

Chapter 11 -- Muff Potter Comes Himself -- Tom's Conscience at Work

Chapter 12 -- Tom Shows his Generosity -- Aunt Polly Weakens

Chapters 11 & 12 Vocabulary:

  • infernal—abominable
  • impudence—marked by rude boldness or disrespect
  • haggard—worn out or exhausted as from hunger or fatigue
  • serene—calm, peaceful
  • miscreant—having very bad morals; wicked
  • conscience—ability to recognize right from wrong
  • blanched—turned pale as if by fear or surprise
  • inquests—legal investigations into the cause of death
  • vogue—leading style or fashion; popularity
  • gory—covered by or stained with blood
  • grisly—ghastly or gruesome
  • phrenological—the study or theory that the conformation of the human head indicates the degree of intelligence and character  
  • clandestinely—done in secret
  • gravity—seriousness
  • consternation—great dismay; paralyzing terror
  • avariciously—greedily; greatly desiring money

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.


Online: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain - 


Lit2Go: http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/34/the-adventures-of-tom-sawyer/

iTunes Free download: Lit2Go series:  You can download the audio-novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and listen to it while you read.  The audio is divided chapter by chapter.  




Chapter 11 Journal Entry:
1. In your opinion, do you think Aunt Polly believes she has “spared the rod and spiled the child?”
 
2. In Chapter 11, what do we, as readers, and Huck and Tom learn about Injun Joe’s character? Identify the supporting evidence.
 
3. In Chapter 11, identify ways Tom is managing his guilt?




Online:

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain -


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.






1-stream.jpg Chapter 13

Chapter 13 -- The Young Pirates -- Going to the Rendezvous -- The Camp-Fire Talk

Chapter 13 & 14 Vocabulary:

  • forsaken—deserted; abandoned
  • succumb—give way, yield; die
  • countersign—a sign or signal used in reply; a password given in answer to the challenge of a sentinel
  • hilt—the handle of a sword, dagger or tool
  • bar (sand bar)—ridge of sand formed by the action of the tides or current
  • foliage—leaves of a plant
  • festooning—a string or chain of flowers, leaves or ribbons hanging in a curve between two points
  • peril—chance of harm or loss; exposure to danger
  • waif—person without a home or friends, especially a neglected child
  • purloined—stolen
  • pervading—spreading throughout
  • obtruded—put forward unwanted and unasked; forced upon
  • gaudy—to bright, cheap and showy to be considered in good taste
  • credulous—too ready to believe; easily deceived
  • conflagration—great and destructive fire
  • limpid—clear or transparent
  • ravenous—very hungry; greedy; rapacious
  • regalia—the emblems or decorations of any society; clothes, especially fine clothing
  • channel—the deeper part of a waterway
  • sumptuous—lavish and costly; magnificent; rich
  • quicksilver—mercury; a heavy silver, metallic element which is liquid at normal temperatures
  • frolic—a merry prank; play; have fun
  • derision—scornful laughter; ridicule



Chapter 13: Making Connections
DIrections Read the following quotes from Chapter 13 and respond by writing a journal entry.  (open response format)

Chapter 13 Making Connections:
First Quote:
“TOM'S mind was made up now. He was gloomy and desperate. He was a forsaken, friendless boy, he said; nobody loved him; when they found out what they had driven him to, perhaps they would be sorry; he had tried to do right and get along, but they would not let him; since nothing would do them but to be rid of him, let it be so; and let them blame HIM for the consequences -- why shouldn't they? What right had the friendless to complain? Yes, they had forced him to it at last: he would lead a life of crime. There was no choice.”

Journal Response #1: Explain a time in your life, when you, like Tom, have felt defeated and felt as though you only had ONE option.

Second Quote:
“Just at this point he met his soul's sworn comrade, Joe Harper -- hard-eyed, and with evidently a great and dismal purpose in his heart. Plainly here were "two souls with but a single thought."

Journal Response #2: Identify a person (friend or family member) who really understands you, “two souls with but a single thought.” Explain.

Third Quote:
“Joe was for being a hermit, and living on crusts in a remote cave, and dying, some time, of cold and want and grief; but after listening to Tom, he conceded that there were some conspicuous advantages about a life of crime, and so he consented to be a pirate.”

Journal Response #3:  If you were to run away to do whatever you wanted to do, what fun place or fun activity would you do?

Fourth Quote:
“Then at once they reached and hovered upon the imminent verge of sleep -- but an intruder came, now, that would not "down." It was conscience. They began to feel a vague fear that they had been doing wrong to run away; and next they thought of the stolen meat, and then the real torture came. They tried to argue it away by reminding conscience that they had purloined sweetmeats and apples scores of times; but conscience was not to be appeased by such thin plausibilities…”

Journal Response #4: Describe a time when your conscience and your guilt kept you up at night. How did you try to rationalize your guilt?



Online:

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain -


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel: 
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.

 




1-stream.jpg Chapter 14

Chapter 14 -- Camp-Life -- A Sensation -- Tom Steals Away from Camp

Chapter 13 & 14 Vocabulary:

  • forsaken—deserted; abandoned
  • succumb—give way, yield; die
  • countersign—a sign or signal used in reply; a password given in answer to the challenge of a sentinel
  • hilt—the handle of a sword, dagger or tool
  • bar (sand bar)—ridge of sand formed by the action of the tides or current
  • foliage—leaves of a plant
  • festooning—a string or chain of flowers, leaves or ribbons hanging in a curve between two points
  • peril—chance of harm or loss; exposure to danger
  • waif—person without a home or friends, especially a neglected child
  • purloined—stolen
  • pervading—spreading throughout
  • obtruded—put forward unwanted and unasked; forced upon
  • gaudy—to bright, cheap and showy to be considered in good taste
  • credulous—too ready to believe; easily deceived
  • conflagration—great and destructive fire
  • limpid—clear or transparent
  • ravenous—very hungry; greedy; rapacious
  • regalia—the emblems or decorations of any society; clothes, especially fine clothing
  • channel—the deeper part of a waterway
  • sumptuous—lavish and costly; magnificent; rich
  • quicksilver—mercury; a heavy silver, metallic element which is liquid at normal temperatures
  • frolic—a merry prank; play; have fun
  • derision—scornful laughter; ridicule

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.



1-stream.jpg Chapter 15

Chapter 15 -- Tom Reconnoiters -- Learns the Situation -- Report at Camp

Chapters 15 & 16 & 17 Vocabulary:

  • shoal—a sand bar which makes the water shallow
  • skiff—a small, light rowboat
  • yaw—turn from a straight course; go unsteadily
  • conjectured—guessed without sufficient evidence
  • bereaved—left desolate and alone; deprived of; robbed of
  • mutinous—rebellious; not controllable; unruly
  • sullen—silent because of bad humor or anger
  • plausible—appearing true, reasonable or fair
  • stupendous—amazing; marvelous; immense
  • retching—vomiting
  • peal—a loud, long sound
  • unflagging—not weakening or failing
  • eloquent—very expressive; speech that has grace and force
  • Six Nations—the federation of Iroquois Indian tribes 
  • loitered—lingered idly
  • vestibule—passage or hall between the outer door and the inside of a building
  • anguished—suffering very great pain or grief; great emotional distress
  • abashed—embarrassed and confused; uneasy and somewhat ashamed
  • soliloquized—talked to oneself

1-stream.jpg Chapter 16

Ch 16 - A Day's Amusements - Tom Reveals a Secret - The Pirates take a Lesson - A Night Surprise - An Indian War

Vocabulary: Chapters 15, 16, and 17:

  • shoal—a sand bar which makes the water shallow
  • skiff—a small, light rowboat
  • yaw—turn from a straight course; go unsteadily
  • conjectured—guessed without sufficient evidence
  • bereaved—left desolate and alone; deprived of; robbed of
  • mutinous—rebellious; not controllable; unruly
  • sullen—silent because of bad humor or anger
  • plausible—appearing true, reasonable or fair
  • stupendous—amazing; marvelous; immense
  • retching—vomiting
  • peal—a loud, long sound
  • unflagging—not weakening or failing
  • eloquent—very expressive; speech that has grace and force
  • Six Nations—the federation of Iroquois Indian tribes 
  • loitered—lingered idly
  • vestibule—passage or hall between the outer door and the inside of a building
  • anguished—suffering very great pain or grief; great emotional distress
  • abashed—embarrassed and confused; uneasy and somewhat ashamed
  • soliloquized—talked to oneself

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.


Chapter 16 notes: 
Mood or imagery??? Symbols and metaphors??? According to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts students will be able to “identify significant literary elements that Identify author’s style and then explain how that author’s style affects the mood and tone of the work.”   Our students first learn how to break down this Common Core skill into manageable parts by “identifying significant literary elements” like imagery or symbolism. Then students use the imagery or symbolism excerpts to discuss Twain’s use of mood and tone.   Can you “figure out” how to manage this Common Core Standard?  

This excerpt is from chapter 16.  Tom, Huck and Joe Harper have run away to Jackson’s Island and on this particular night their new life away from civilization is being interrupted by a storm.
 
   “About midnight Joe awoke, and called the boys. There was a brooding oppressiveness in the air that seemed to bode something. The boys huddled themselves together and sought the friendly companionship of the fire, though the dull dead heat of the breathless atmosphere was stifling. They sat still, intent and waiting. The solemn hush continued. Beyond the light of the fire everything was swallowed up in the blackness of darkness. Presently there came a quivering glow that vaguely revealed the foliage for a moment and then vanished. By and by another came, a little stronger. Then another. Then a faint moan came sighing through the branches of the forest and the boys felt a fleeting breath upon their cheeks, and shuddered with the fancy that the Spirit of the Night had gone by. There was a pause. Now a weird flash turned night into day and showed every little grass-blade, separate and distinct, that grew about their feet. And it showed three white, startled faces, too. A deep peal of thunder went rolling and tumbling down the heavens and lost itself in sullen rumblings in the distance. A sweep of chilly air passed by, rustling all the leaves and snowing the flaky ashes broadcast about the fire. Another fierce glare lit up the forest and an instant crash followed that seemed to rend 
the tree-tops right over the boys' heads. They clung together in terror, in the thick gloom that followed. A few big rain-drops fell pattering upon the leaves.” (Twain 169)
 

Is this excerpt an example of imagery?  If so, how does this example of imagery “affect the mood” of chapter 16? However, could this passage be an example of symbolism?  If so, what does it symbolize and how does this example of symbolism “affect the mood and tone” of chapter 16?  Interestingly enough, students argued that this passage was both imagery and symbolism.  

Chapter 16: "…brooding oppressiveness…" 
http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/ts-ch16-broodoppressive.pdf



Enrichment:


Note: We took time to play: cat's cradle" and old 19th century game:)  
Cat's Cradle - a 19th century child's game played with the string a child carried around in his/her pocket pocket:
http://www.ifyoulovetoread.com/book/chten_cats1105.htm



We also compared the game to the refrain in Harry Chapin's folk rock,  "Cat's In the Cradle" lyrics: How would Tom and Huck react/understand the "Cat's In the Cradle" lyrics based on their life experiences?
 
Copyright information: Writer(s): Sandy Chapin, Harry F. Chapin, Copyright: Story Songs Ltd.. 1974 folk rock

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/harrychapin/catsinthecradle.html and http://www.lyricsdepot.com/harry-chapin/cats-in-the-cradle.html


Note: How do you change this information into a MLA citation???




awindchimes.jpg  Making Connections/Supplemental Writing:

1. "What is your verse?" 
Think about a time when weather had an effect on your life. It might be a profoundly frightening effect like a hurricane or a flood. It might be a profoundly joyful effect like a camping trip or a day at the shore/beach. It might be profoundly ordinary like coming home after school.

2. Write a description of this memory. Descriptive writing includes sensory information, adjectives, imagery, and literary terms, like metaphors and symbols. 

3. Interview someone and compare your memory to the memory of another person who shared the same experience. 

4. Remember to find at least three images you can insert into the text of this document. This is part of the technology/media frameworks.


Weather-related Memory Resources:

Resources: 
Know that sometime in April we will look at the ways in which weather appears in everything we will read this year. 

“And welcome to the American Experience. I’m David McCullough. We are a nation of experts on the weather. No people on earth spend anything like the time we do talking about the weather, reading about it, tuning in for the latest forecast. And the phenomenon is old. The Founding Fathers had an inordinate fascination in the weather. From the very day of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, to record the heat in Philadelphia, Thomas Jefferson took time out from the debate to buy a thermometer. Until his dying hourly nearly, George Washington studiously maintained a weather diary. Some of the most vivid passages of all our literature are of storms at sea, mountain mists, Chinooks, twisters, blizzards, baking summer afternoons on the high plains. Mark Twain once made a whole speech on New England weather alone. ‘The weather is always doing something there,’ he said. ‘In spring I’ve counted 126 different kinds of weather in twenty-four hours.’ Our film tonight is about a savage hurricane that slammed into New England and the coast of Long Island almost without warning. For despite all the talk and interest in the weather, real storm forecasts were late in coming. It was not until 1871 that even a rudimentary weather service was established and even as late as the 1930’s, the time of our story, forecasts provided by the weather bureau were hardly adequate. Most importantly, there was still no radar. Also, once phone lines were down American communities, even large communities, were cut off from outside information to a degree hard for us to imagine. The Hurricane of ’38.“ (Narrated by David McCullough)

David McCullough narrated of the Hurricane of 38
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum (copyright 1900)and The WIzard of Oz produced by MGM in 1939
http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/baum-ch1-weather.pdf

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, by Washington Irving (copyright 1820, but the setting is circa 1790's)
http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/irving-weather.pdf

The Lion King, produced by the artists and writers at the Disney Studio in 1994
http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/lionking-weather1.pdf

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain (pseudonym: Samuel Langhorne Clemens) (copyright: 1876)
http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/clemens-ch16-weather.pdf

 

 


 

1-stream.jpg Chapters 17 - 20

Chapter 17 -- Memories of the Lost Heroes -- The Point in Tom's Secret

Chapter 18 -- Tom's Feelings Investigated -- Wonderful Dream -- Becky Thatcher Overshadowed -- Tom Becomes Jealous -- Black Revenge

Chapter 19 -- Tom Tells the Truth

Chapter 20 -- Becky in a Dilemma -- Tom's Nobility Asserts Itself

Vocabulary: Chapters 18, 19, and 20

  • audible—loud enough to be heard
  • menagerie—a collection or assortment of animals for exhibition
  • notoriety—being famous for something bad; ill fame
  • vindictive—bearing a grudge; wanting revenge
  • reconciliation—settlement or arrangement of a disagreement or difference 
  • ingenious—clever, skillful, good at inventing 
  • scornful—showing contempt, mocking
  • urchin—poor ragged child
  • anatomy—the science studying the structure of animals and plants
  • lethargy—drowsy dullness; lack of energy; sluggish inactivity
  • smote—(smite)—strike hard
  • vengeance—revenge; punishment in return for a wrong

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.



Online:

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain -


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.





1-stream.jpg Chapters 21 - 23

Chapter 21 -- Youthful Eloquence -- Compositions by the Young Ladies -- A Lengthy Vision -- The Boy's Vengeance Satisfied

Chapter 22 -- Tom's Confidence Betrayed -- Expects Signal Punishment

Chapter 23 -- Old Muff's Friends -- Muff Potter in Court -- Muff Potter Saved

Chapter 23:

Chapter 23 is the trial of Muff Potter, but we cannot understand this chapter in full if we do not go back and remember Chapter 9.  Tom sneaks out after hearing Huck's signal (meow) and the boys go to the graveyard looking for ghost and planning to bury a dead cat.  While at the graveyard three intruders disrupt their adventure.  One man is killed, one man is knocked out and blamed for the murder, and one man - the real murderer - runs away.  In Chapter 10, Tom and Huck promise never to tell what they saw.   These chapters are pivotal to the understanding of Chapter 23 and to the understanding of the development of Tom as the protagonist in this novel and Huck as one of the main characters in this novel.

Now think like an educator: What questions might I ask related to Chapters 23, 9, and 10?  What questions might I ask about the methods Mark Twain uses to develop his characters?  What questions might I ask about the plot being moved forward by Chapter 23 but only because, we, the audience, have a clear understanding of Chapters 9 and 10.


Online:

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain -


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.

 


1-stream.jpg Chapter 24

Chapter 24 -- Tom as the Village Hero -- Days of Splendor and Nights of Horror -- Pursuit of Injun Joe

Vocabulary: Chapters 21 - 24

  • gilded—covered with a thin layer of gold; made to be bright and shiny
  • dome—a rounded top of something; like a rounded roof
  • ferule—stick or ruler for punishing children by striking them on the hand
  • dominie—schoolmaster; clergyman
  • spasmodic—occurring very irregularly
  • gesticulation—lively or excited gestures; wild waving of the hands
  • edification—moral improvement or benefit
  • frivolous—silly; lacking seriousness; senseless
  • geniality—the quality of being friendly and cheerful
  • garret—space in a house just below a sloping roof
  • temperance—exhibiting self-control; being moderate in habits; speech; actions, etc.
  • abstain—do without something; refrain
  • convalescent—recovering health and strength after an illness
  • minstrel—singer or musician; a white man in make-up appearing as a black man who entertains by song and dance
  • mesmerizer—hypnotist
  • measles—an infectious disease characterized by a bad cold, fever, and a breaking out of red spots on the skin
  • tract—book or pamphlet on a religious topic
  • forbearance—patience; control; not acting out against someone when you have the right to
  • incongruous—not appropriate; out of place 
  • verdict—the result of a trial—guilty or innocent
  • haggard—having a wild or wasted look as if from lack of sleep
  • stolid—having or showing little or no emotion or sympathy
  • perplexity—being confused, not understanding
  • delirium—a temporary state of mental excitement, confusion, or insanity 
  • corpse—a dead body

Chapter 24:

Do not be deceived by the length of Chapter 24.  While it is very short, it is filled with very powerful information.  We learn why Tom was out so late in Chapter 23 that he had to sneak in.  We know that he went to see Muff Potter's lawyer.  Tom has been struggling with his conscience for a long time.  To understand Chapter 24, you have to go back to Chapter 16 and re-visit Jackson's Island, "the brooding oppressiveness," and Tom's childlike need to runaway literally to Jackson's Island, but also to runaway metaphorically speaking from facing the truth that he must divulge (tell).

Think like an educator: What lines might I use from Chapters 24, 23, and 16 to make connections with Tom's decision-making, especially his decision to talk to Muff Potter's lawyer?   What have you learned about Tom from Chapter 1 through Chapter 24?  How has Tom changed?  Remember we are reading now knowing full well that the chapters we read move the plot forward to the denouement, but only because we can look back.  In Chapters 24, 23, and 16 we are dealing with the original conflict, which might be wanting to grow up, but not wanting the responsibilities that come with growing up.  Might this also be a theme?

Know something about the conflict of any story, the climax of that story, and the denouement of that story.  The conflict is related to the climax and both must align with the denouement: for example, we see a conflict in Chapter 10.  Tom and Huck act like small children when they decide not to tell what they saw. The conflict becomes climactic when Tom takes the responsibility to tell the lawyer (Chapter 23) what he saw in Chapter 9.  Chapter 10 (a conflict) moves the plot along to Chapter 23 (a climax), but it is not until Chapter 24.  It is in Chapter 24 that we understand the outcome (denouement) which is Muff Potter's release from jail and his gratitude towards Tom.   

Novels often have more than  one conflict-climax-denouement connection.  Just a hint for the future - write down these minor conflict-climax-denouement connections while you are reading.  When you finish the novel go back over your list, and then decide which conflict-climax-denouement connection is the major connection for that particular novel. 


Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.


Online:

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain -


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.
 


 

1-stream.jpg Chapters 25 - 36


Chapter 25 -- About Kings and Diamonds -- Search for the Treasure -- Dead People and Ghosts

Chapter 25:

Do Tom and Huck go back to what they know - being kids and playing pirates?   Is this a connection to Chapter 13?


Chapter 26 -- The Haunted House -- Sleepy Ghosts -- A Box of Gold -- Bitter Luck

Chapter 27 -- Doubts to be Settled -- The Young Detectives

Chapter 28 -- An Attempt at No. Two -- Huck Mounts Guard

Chapter 29 -- The Picnic -- Muck on Injun Joe's Track -- The "Revenge" Job -- Aid for the Widow

Chapter 30 -- The Welchman Reports -- Huck Under Fire -- The Story Circulated -- A New Sensation -- Hope Giving Way to Despair

Chapter 31 -- An Exploring Expedition -- Trouble Commences -- Lost in the Cave -- Total Darkness -- Found but not Saved

Chapter 32 -- Tom tells the Story of their Escape -- Tom's Enemy in Safe Quarters

Chapter 33 -- The Fate of Injun Joe -- Huck and Tom Compare Notes -- An Expedition to the Cave -- Protection Against Ghosts -- "An Awful                             Snug Place" -- A Reception at the Widow Douglas's

Chapter 34 -- Springing a Secret -- Mr. Jones' Surprise a Failure

Chapter 35 -- A New Order of Things -- Poor Huck -- New Adventures Planned

Chapter 36 – Conclusion

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing  Company. 1879. Print.




Online:

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain -


MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel: 
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.





1-steamboat.jpg  Skills and Strategies

Elements of a Folk Tale:

1. Folk tales are stories told to give special insight into the daily lives of the people living in a specific
culture.
Folk tales honor the similarities of all people - usually doing this with a sense of humor.

2. The protagonist of a folk tale often seems real, but remember that the author is telling a cultural story.

3. The settings of a folk tale are not developed with a specific time or place.
Any time or place will do, because folk tales are about mankind.

4. The themes of folk tales tell of the struggles and triumphs, joys and sorrows, comedies and tragedies of all people … of all of mankind.

5. Rational: Folk tales mirror human behavior. The reader can identify with the life, the struggles, and the joys of the protagonist.

Massachusetts Common Core


Explore the following definitions. These definitions were part of your summer reading pamphlet.

Author’s Style: It is the writer’s unique way of communicating ideas. Elements contributing to style include word choice, sentence length, tone, figurative language, and use of dialogue.

Tone: It is an expression of a writer’s attitude toward a subject. Unlike mood, which is intended to shape the reader’s emotional response, tone reflects the feelings of the writer. Tone can be serious, humorous, sarcastic, playful, ironic, ...

Setting: It is the time and place of the action in a novel.

Mood: It is the feeling or atmosphere (setting) the writer creates for the reader. The use of connotation, details, dialogue, imagery, figurative language, foreshadowing, setting, and rhythm can help establish mood.

Imagery: Words and phrases that create vivid sensory experiences for the reader. Most images are visual, but imagery may appeal to the senses of smell, hearing, taste, or touch.

Character Development: The method a writer uses to develop characters. There are four basic methods:

• The writer may describe the character’s physical characteristics and appearance

• A character’s nature may be revealed through his/her own speech, thoughts, feelings, or actions

• The speech, thoughts, feelings or actions of other character’s can be used to develop a character

• The narrator can make direct comments about another character

Plot: The plot is the action or sequence of events in a story. Plot is usually a series of related incidents that build to develop the story. There are five basic elements in a plot line: conflict, rising action, climax, falling action, denouement.

Theme: The theme is a central idea, primary action, or abstract concept that is made concrete in person, action, and image. Sometimes the theme is directly stated in the work, and sometimes it is given indirectly. There may be more than one major theme in a given work, but there can be minor themes.

Symbol: A symbol is a person, place, or thing that represents something beyond itself. Symbols can succinctly communicate complicated, emotionally rich ideas.

Figurative Language: Figurative Language is language that communicates ideas beyond the ordinary or literal meaning of the words. For example: author’s use simile, metaphor, personification, and/or hyperbole, etc., to convey a deeper meaning to the audience.


Review: Genre

Review: Elements of Fiction

Review: Themes

Review: Citation Guide

Elements of a Folk Tale:

1. Folk tales are stories told to give special insight into the daily lives of the people living in a specific

culture. Folk tales honor the similarities of all people - usually doing this with a sense of humor.

2. The protagonist of a folk tale often seems real, but remember that the author is telling a cultural

story.

3. The settings of a folk tale are not developed with a specific time or place.

Any time or place will do, because folk tales are about mankind.

4. The themes of folk tales tell of the struggles and triumphs, joys and sorrows, comedies and

tragedies of all people … of all of mankind.

5. Rational: Folk tales mirror human behavior. The reader can identify with the life, the struggles, and

the joys of the protagonist.


Literary Resources:

graphic organizer - genre (PDF)




1-steamboat.jpg Writing Resources

Online Unabridged etext:
University of Virginia unabridged etext, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html
Note: The University of VIrginia unabridged etext, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, includes page numbers.



MLA CItation University of VIrginia unabridged etext:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. New York and London: Harper Brothers, 1903. University of Virginia
Library etext. Web. 1 March 2012. >http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/Twa2Tom.html<



Hardcopy Novel:

MLA Citation Hardcopy Novel:
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford, Connecticut: American Publishing Company. 1879. Print.


2. Study Guides
The New York TImes Link, Practicing Annotated Note-taking Strategies, will provide you with note-taking strategies discussed during class.

Chapters 1 and 2:

Chapter 7:
Character Development http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/ts-ch7-char-dev.pdf

Chapter 9:
Author's Style http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/ts-ch9-authors-style.pdf

Chapters 10 and 11:
Mood and Imagery http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/ts-ch10-11-mood-imagery.pdf

Chapters 12 & 2:
Protagonist & Symbolism http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/ts-ch12amp2-symb-protag.pdf

Chapter 13:
Genre - Elements of a Folk Tale http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/ts-ch13-folktale-evidence.pdf

Chapter 16:
Symbols "...brooding oppressiveness..." http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/ts-ch16-broodoppressive.pdf

Chapter 26:
Symbols - "Tools" & "Ruinous Staircase" http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/ts-ch26-tools-ruinous-stairs.pdf



1-choice-is-ours.jpg Education Is a Choice and The Choice Is Ours
Ms. Laster's "Tom Sawyer Final Project":  

The project is grade out of 100 points.  Now look at your notes, if you forgot what the total project is worth, for example: 100 x 3 or 100 x 4?  


 The Adventures of Tom Sawyer 
..............................................................................................................................................
 Your Grade
........................
 Teacher's Grade
................................
The outside presentation of the paper bag/box/container needs to include the following:
  • the title
  • author
  • a quote that represents Tom Sawyer
Be creative when you design the exterior of the paper bag/box/container and when you present your project.

Total Possible Points: 15 (5/title, 5/author, 5/quote)

                      
The following are included in the"inside of the paper bag/box/container:

Total Possible Points: 15

   
 3 major symbols:
Identify 3 major symbols from the text.  You might use a three dimensional symbol or draw the symbols on cards.  Remember to explain the importance of the symbol and what it represents. (Include page numbers.)  Be creative in presenting your 3 major themes and the supporting evidence for these themes.

Total Possible Points: 15

   



 Theme and 3 examples of supporting evidence:
Choose 3 examples from the text that support the theme you chose as the overall theme of this novel.  You might identify the theme on one side of a card and include the supporting evidence on the other side.  (Include page numbers.) Be creative in presenting your theme and the 3 supporting evidence.

Total Possible Points: 15

   
 5 examples of dialect and the image that best identifies the dialect:
Choose 5 examples of dialect from the text and include the image that relates to the dialect you chose.  (Include page numbers.) Be creative in presenting your 5 examples of dialect.

Total Possible Points: 15

   
 5 examples of imagery and the image:
Choose 5 examples of imagery from the text and an image relating the written description of the that image.  (Include the page number.)  Be creative in presenting your 5 examples of imagery.

Total Possible Points: 15

   
 1 universal human truth:
Identify one human truth from the text that Mark Twain has identified in this novel.  Use a direct quote and include the page number.  Be creative in presenting this human truth.

Total Possible Points: 20

   
 Overall Quality of the Presentation:
You are almost done.  Ask yourself: 
1. Do my designs relate to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer?  
2. Have I used this rubric as a checklist and completed every part of the project? 
3. Have I included my name on my project?

Total Possible Points: 20

   
Projects due: Tuesday, April 24th
The original directions were given Thursday, April 12th and Friday, April13th before the April break.  If you were not in school on the 12th or the 13th and you have not spoken to Ms. Laster, then with respect to our class room policies, you were expected to stay after school Monday, April 23rd.  If you have not spoken to Ms. Laster about the project then you must see Ms. Laster between April 24th and April 27th to learn about the project.  



 Projects presented: Monday, April 30th    



 

1-choice-is-ours.jpg  Cautionary Tale

1. Know that we have studied the following information since September.  The study of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer was an opportunity to ask questions, study and be proficient in your knowledge of each term, definitions, and genre listed below.

2. You must be able to proficiently discuss all of the following: 

  • FIve Parts of a Plot
  • Definition of a Plot
  • Definition of Genre and the Four Major Categories of Genre
  • Definitions of the Five Elements of a Folk Tale and Knowledge that Folk Tales are subcategories of FIction
  • Definition of Theme
  • Definitions of Protagonist, Character, and the Four Methods an Author Uses to Develop a Character
  • Definitions of Setting, Imagery, and Mood of a Story
  • Definitions of Metaphor, Simile and Personification
  • Definitions of Hyperbole, Hyperbolic, and Understatement
  • Definitions of Symbol, Symbolism, and Symbolic
  • Definitions of Irony and Ironic
  • Definitions of Author's Style and Tone of a Story
  • Definitions of the Five Elements of a Myth and Knowledge that Myths are subcategories of FIction (Lion King)
  • Definitions of the Five Elements of a Fairy Tale and Knowledge that Fairy Tales are subcategories of FIction (Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
  • Definitions of the Five Elements of a Legend and Knowledge that Legends are subcategories of FIction (Legend of Sleepy Hollow)
  • Definitions of the Five Elements of a Documentary and Knowledge that Documentaries are subcategories of NON FIction
As a reminder: the following are examples of documentaries that we have studied this year
  • PBS Hurricane of '38 is a documentary.
  • PBS Mark Twain directed by Ken Burns is a documentary.
  • Jacques D'Ambrois - Who's Dancin' Now is a documentary.

3. You must be able to recognize examples of literary terms in the novel.
  • FIve Parts of a Plot
  • Definition of a Plot
  • Definition of Genre and the Four Major Categories of Genre
  • Definitions of the Five Elements of a Folk Tale and Knowledge that Folk Tales are subcategories of FIction
  • Definition of Theme
  • Definitions of Protagonist, Character, and the Four Methods an Author Uses to Develop a Character
  • Definitions of Setting, Imagery, and Mood of a Story
  • Definitions of Metaphor, Simile and Personification
  • Definitions of Hyperbole, Hyperbolic, and Understatement
  • Definitions of Symbol, Symbolism, and Symbolic
  • Definitions of Irony and Ironic
  • Definitions of Author's Style and Tone of a Story

4. You must be able to use the literary terms as tools to enhance your writing.
  • FIve Parts of a Plot
  • Definition of a Plot
  • Definition of Genre and the Four Major Categories of Genre
  • Definitions of the Five Elements of a Folk Tale and Knowledge that Folk Tales are subcategories of FIction
  • Definition of Theme
  • Definitions of Protagonist, Character, and the Four Methods an Author Uses to Develop a Character
  • Definitions of Setting, Imagery, and Mood of a Story
  • Definitions of Metaphor, Simile and Personification
  • Definitions of Hyperbole, Hyperbolic, and Understatement
  • Definitions of Symbol, Symbolism, and Symbolic
  • Definitions of Irony and Ironic
  • Definitions of Author's Style and Tone of a Story




 

1butterflyb.jpg  Moving on


...I never saw another butterfly... Children's Drawings and Poems from Terezin Concentration Camp, 1942-1944

Volavkova, Hana, eds.  ...I never saw another butterfly... Children's Drawings and Poems from Terezin Concentration Camp, 1942-1944. 
         New York: Schocken Books. 1993. Print. 


Bottom Divider

My TeacherWeb
©2014 TeacherWeb, Inc.