TeacherWeb

“… and he strode down the street with his mouth full of harmony and his soul full of gratitude.” (Twain. p20-21.)

turnerd@seekonk.k12.School Link
 
8th Grade Orientation
8th Grade Orientation TheArt Of Education Text Complexity Common Core SWBAT
8th Grade Orientation The Essential Question Keeping Your Journal WritingTips&Technology
Vocabulary Exercises Reading/Vocab Guides
A. SeptemberOctober HomeworkClasswork Virtual BulletinBoard
B. NovemberDecember HomeworkClasswork Virtual BulletinBoard
C. January&February HomeworkClasswork Virtual BulletinBoard
D. MarchAprilMay HomeworkClasswork Virtual Bulletinboard
1a Summer Reading
1b Video/URL Choices: Learning ABILITIES
2a Informational Texts: Long Island Express/ Hurricane '38 & Hurricane Carol 1954
2b Informational Texts Complex Themes WIZARD OF OZ L.FrankBaum vs. MGM American FairyTale
3 Informational Texts Short Stories/Novellas Washington Irving and SLEEPY HOLLOW Vocab&Text Complexity
4 DELIGHT SONG SpiritWeek Play, Artifact &Genealogy/FamilyTree
5 Informational Texts Period Literature UK Charles Dickens CHRISTMAS CAROL Protagonist Profile Theme Complexity
6a Informational Texts Creation of Music Language of Literature
6b Informational Texts Drama LION KING Complex Themes &Visual Imagery
7 Informational Texts U.S.History mid 1800's Period Literature USA MarkTwain SLClemens TOM SAWYER
8 Informational Texts Research&Technology DIARY of ANNE FRANK & PLACE at the TABLE ...I NEVER SAW ANOTHER BUTTERFLY
9 Informational Texts Poet/Poem a Day Poetry&PoeticLanguage Ballads, Odes, Elegies, Petrach's Sonnet, and Shakespeare's Sonnet
10a Resource SeptJun Informational Texts Primary Sources Civics&Citizenship Veteran's Day, Nov.11: WorldWar I Dec.Truce
10b Resource SeptJun Diversity: English Science Social Studies Math SpecialEducation Collaboration
10c Resource SeptJun Building Character "It'sTheLittleThings" "ThePowerOfThree"
10d Resource MayJun PersLearningProj EarthDay Ecology WhaleWatch&MobyDick
Handouts Info Texts
Handouts Media/Film
Handouts Literature
Handouts Poetry
Handouts Grammar
Handouts Composition
Handouts "READING" Pers Learning Projects HANDMADE BOOKS 2&3D SCHEMATICS
URL RESEARCH PrimarySourceDoc LibraryOfCongress
URL RESEARCH Literature&Poetry Writing&Media
URL RESEARCH SeekonkBicentennial RedSox Centennial
VIDEO&PHOTOGRAPHY Rhetoric, Speeches, and Our Collective Past
VIDEO&PHOTOGRAPHY Poetry Music & the SpokenWord
VIDEO&PHOTOGRAPHY Fiction, Drama & History
VIDEO&PHOTOGRAPHY Writing Reading & Documentary
JPEG Binding Books
JPEG LiteraryTerms
JPEG TraditionalLiterature
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A. SeptemberOctober HomeworkClasswork Virtual BulletinBoard



Ms. Turner: 8th Grade English at Dr. Kevin M. Hurley Middle School (turnerd@seekonk.k12.ma.us)

To educators and to all who choose to use my photographs, documents and information that are posted on this site - Should you choose to use these materials in your classroom or for any other educational purpose, please remember not only to cite this website as your resource, but also to request permission to use these documents. Documents, images, and information used for educational purposes has been cited. Nothing can be sold. Teach your students and/or remember the etiquette and importance of citing that which does not belong to you. Requesting permission is as easy as clicking on the mail icon at the top of the page and sending your request to me via email.  Thank you.


Directions: Scroll down to find classwork and homework listed by date. 
                      Months are highlighted in green; days/dates are highlighted in yellow.



1. Keep your sense of humor:)
The Great Typo Hunt: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=6944729n





Virtual Bulletin Board: September though December Classwork and Homework Cache

Open House: Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Dear Parents and Guardians,

I look forward to meeting everyone!   

I want to thank the parents who were able to come to the Open House.  I know after raising three children how difficult it can be to go to every open house and every meeting.  Please know that if you were not able to attend, than you can email me to share good news, concerns and any questions you might have.  Communication between and among families and educators always leads to a positive experience for the student.  

Highlights from Open House:
  • class note-taking strategies
  • resources including TeacherWeb.com available to all students
  • 21st century classrooms and reading resources (Lit2Go)
  • Learning is not a due date. While due dates are important, grades are based on a student's effort and the progress he/she is making.  All students have ABILITIES.   
Albert Einstein once said, 
“Everyone is a genius, but if you judge a fish on its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”

Note: a former 8th grade student introduced me to Albert Einstein's quote. Thank you, Kevin:)
My wish: Perhaps one day educators will be able to teach, instead of proctor standardized tests.
                 Wouldn't it be wonderful if educators had 180 days to teach a child!



October (through the Oz take-home test due November 5th)


Tuesday, November 5th

Collect Oz take-home exams


Preview the NovemberDecember Homework/classwork page: B. HomeworkClasswork NovemberDecember Virtual BulletinBoard


1-oz-map.jpg Monday, November 4th

Agenda: classwork and homework

Class:

1. We will finish  the 1938 MGM Wizard of Oz and students will hand in the notes they took during the film.  

2. We will continue to review revision techniques during class.


Homework:

1. Please review the take-home exam notes on this page beginning with Friday October 25th.

2. The typed final copies are due in class tomorrow, Tuesday, November 5th.

3. Feel free to stay after school for any last minute review of writing.  

Note: After school sessions are more like study groups and less like individual tutoring.  Come prepared with a purpose.


Looking ahead: We will begin reading Washington Irving's classic, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow this week.


Looking ahead: We will research VIctorian England during the last weeks of November in preparation fro our trip to Zeiterion theater to see the Dickensian class, The Christmas Carol, December 3rd.  We will also read the classic during class in the weeks before the December break. 


Note: This page is full.  Begin using Homework/classwork page:  B. HomeworkClasswork NovemberDecember Virtual BulletinBoard



1-8mm-projector.jpg Friday, November 1st

Take home exam drafts due today

Take home exam as a final typed copy is due Tuesday, November 5th



1-halloween.jpg  Thursday, October 31

Be smart!  Be safe!!! Happy Halloween!!!

8th grade students visit TriCounty Regional Vocational High School Technical High School http://www.tri-county.tc/



-1-seek-icon.jpg Wednesday, October 30th

Go Red Sox!!!



1-8mm-projector.jpg  Monday, October 28th, Tuesday, October 29th, Wednesday October 30th

Students will watch the 1939 MGM fil and compare the film to the novel.

Review the novel notes - Scroll down to "NOVEL NOTES": http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/apt5.aspx

Review the film Resources: Scroll down to "FILM RESOURCES": http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/apt5.aspx

Watch the eleven minute informational "remastering" video.





Common Core Skills
8.RL.1 Pose and answer questions in order to show accurate literal understanding of ideas, characters, settings, events and organizational elements in literary works.

8.RL.2 Explain explicit references to elements of social, cultural, and historical context in a literary work, a documentary, or a film.

8.RL.5 Identify significant literary devices, such as symbolism or irony, which define an author's, illustrator's or film director's style. Explain how the author's style and the film director's style affects the mood and tone of a work.


Class Activity:

a. L. Frank Baum's novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, compared to MGM's 1939 film, The Wizard of Oz


Class Discussion Prompts:

Novel/film Comparison Notes:
a. How does descriptive writing and visual imagery affect the mood of a novel (Baum Oz); the mood of a film (MGM Oz)?

b. Identify the introduction to the movie and explain how the MGM studio writers introduced the characters.

c. Identify three images that become significant symbols in the film. (ex: the sun breaking through the dark clouds symbolizes the
conflict and foreshadows the happy ending (denouement).
d. Compare the dirt road in Kansas to the Yellow Brick Road in Oz. Parallel plots???

e. How are acts of intelligence, compassion, and courage revealed in novels (Baum Oz) and film (MGM Oz)?

f. Identify three scenes or series of scenes in the film through which dialogue moves the plot forward.

g. Is "Home" a location you can find using GPS or is "Home" the way you choose to live your life or is "home"."the greatest journey from
your head to your heart" (Dag Hammarskjol)?


Homework -Take Home Exam: drafts are due Friday, November 1st and the final typed copies are due TUesday, November 5th

Draft the following three writing prompts by Friday, November 1st, so we can revise and/or begin to revise the drafts during class Friday.

Note: An open response includes a topic sentence, background information, supporting evidence and a concluding statement. Write your open responses the same way you wrote your response to "how does the protagonist affect the direction of the plot?" If you are writing as we have been practicing, than you will need 15 -18 sentences to complete the response. See me after school Monday and Wednesday for extra help.

1. Writing prompt: Throughout the novel you have been asked to think about your "journey", your "road of yellow brick" and what "home" means to you. We have talked about the characters' journeys, "roads of yellow brick" and how the characters understand "home". 

Notes: Now, teach me what you have learned about " journeys", "roads of yellow brick" and "home". Teaching me is writing to inform.

Hint: One approach is to manage this writing prompt by determining the theme of The Wonderful WIzard of Oz. Once you determine the theme, then, analyze (figure out) the development of that theme over the course of the novel including characters, setting and plot.  (See your class notes from Thursday, October 24th.  We completed this question during class.)


2. Writing prompt: Choose and complete one of the bulleted questions below:
  • Who is the Scarecrow in your life? Is there a bit of the Scarecrow in you?
  • Who is the Tin Woodman in your life" Is there a bit of the Tin Woodman in you?
  • Who is the Cowardly Lion in your life? Is there a bit of the Cowardly Lion in you?

3. Writing prompt: Why is l. Frank Baum's Wonderful Wizard of Oz a reflection of life that helps us define the greater good in society?

Hint: One approach is to manage this writing prompt by determining the theme of The Wonderful WIzard of Oz. Once you determine the theme, then, analyze (figure out) the development of that theme over the course of the novel including characters, setting and plot.

Note: If you are struggling with "a reflection of life that helps us define the greater good in society" than respond to "a reflection of life" and know that you have my permission to cross out the greater good in society part of the writing prompt.




Skills and strategies reviewed for the take home exam:

1. Writing thematic statements - last week's class discussions summarized
“Theme is the central message of a literary work. It is not the same as a subject, which can be expressed in a word or two: HOME, courage, survival, war, pride, etc. The theme is the idea the author wishes to convey about that subject. It is expressed as a sentence or general statement about life or human nature. A literary work can have more than one theme, and most themes are not directly stated but are implied. The reader must think about all the elements of the work and use them to make inferences, or reasonable guesses, as to which themes seem to be implied.” (from Laying the Foundation series of books published by AP Strategies in Dallas)

For example, if “home” is a topic/subject of two novels, a major theme in one of the novels could be “Home, if shared by others, can be an opportunity for us to grow not just a place to live,” while in the other novel, the theme might be “Home can be a place where we learn that the human spirit will triumph over all challenges.” Notice that the topic/subject is the same, but the messages about that topic/subject are different in different works.


2. Writing to Inform Common Core Skills:

Writing Skills.8.2.
SWBAT write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

Writing Skills.8.2.b.
SWBAT develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.


3. MLA Citation - online:
Baum, L. Frank. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Chicago: George M. Hill Co.. 1900. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 October 2011.


4. Rubric: Writing to Inform


Note: 
Periods A, D and E completed the review.

Period B lost time from the class review because of Thursday's magazine drive. Period B lost time from Friday's SuperCore because of the Pink Out photo taken in the gym last period. Yes. Students in Period B might feel like they need more information. 

Getting more information begins by paying close attention during these short, disjointed classes. Paying attention is difficult especially when our routine is changed. You can do it!!! You are intelligent young adults and you can choose to do what you need to do!!!! Don't forget to use after school time if you need more information and/or extra-help.



Monday after school:

While some students were confused, frustrated and perhaps a bit discouraged after school today, others "figured out" how to manage the take-home exam.  This is what they figured out:

1. Identify the take home exam questions on the front of your student unit guide.
2. Choose one one of the questions that you identified on your student unit guide and write a draft.
3. Choose the second question and write a draft for the second question.
4. Choose the third question and write a draft for the third question.

Note: After you have taken the time to write the drafts using sentences and paragraphs, I can show you how to check what you have written using the rubric for writing to inform.

Cautionary tale: Come to class Friday, November 1st with all drafts complete - DRAFTS not final copies.  The final copies for the three take home exam questions are due Tuesday, November 5th. 


Students who were confused, frustrated and perhaps a bit discouraged today after school used strategies that did not help them draft responses for the take home exam.  The following are the strategies they used:

1. They did not identify the take home questions on the front of the student unit guide and were not sure what questions to answer.
2. They did not write the responses in sentence/paragraph format.  Instead they bulleted bits and pieces of information.
3. They could not check their responses using the rubric I gave them this afternoon, because they did not write the responses.  This led to greater confusion for them.  
4. Some students seemed to be unsure when I asked them to draft a topic sentence that identified the topic in the question. 
5. Some students seemed to be unsure when I asked them to identify the background information the audience needed to know.
6. Some students seemed to be unsure when I asked them to draft a concluding statement that reminded the audience of the topic sentence.
7. Some students seemed to be unsure when I asked them to identify the supporting evidence they would use to support the topic. (Note: Finding the supporting evidence was last week's classwork and homework.)

This writing process is the same writing process we used at the beginning of the year when we answered the question: How does the protagonist affect the direction of the plot?  The rubric is similar to the rubric we used when we checked our drafts at the beginning of the year.  The rubric helped us "fugue out" how to revise that draft.  

There are no SHORT CUTS!!!  Writing is a process that begins with knowing the writing prompt.  Once a student identifies the writing prompt, then he/she can write a draft and revise that draft with purpose using a rubric. Use the following steps, if you never wrote anyhting into your class notes:
  • Go back to your class notes. Review your class notes.
  • Go back to your "thinking homework". Review your "thinking homework".  
  • Identify and then read writing prompts on the front of your student unit guide.
  • Remember that we talked about the answers to the writing prompts on the front of your student unit guide during class discussions.
  • Draft a response using your class notes and "thinking" homework.
  • Use the rubric to "figure out" how to revise your response.
  • Revise your response.  Hint: anything that you could not complete on the rubric needs to be added to your draft.
  • Use the rubric again.  DId you forget to include anything else? Revise again, if necessary.
  • Type your response.
Note: I can NOT tell you if your writing is "good".  Only you can "figure out" if it is complete by using the rubric.

I can tell you that it is OK to try.

I can tell you that it is OK to make mistakes.

I can tell you that it is OK to learn from trying and making mistakes.

I can tell you that you are AWESOME!!!





1-oz-map.jpg Friday, October 25th

Agenda and Homework:

Class:  Preface, Chapters 1 - 24 Take Home exam 
a. Be independent and self-directed.
b. Budget the time you need to complete your take-home exam and be mature enough to ask for clarity, assistance, and/or tech resources.
  • Your take home exam was assigned today and it is due the Tuesday after Halloween, November 5th.
  • You have eleven days/evenings between now and the day this assignment is due. 
  • You have two weekends and three after-school days between the time it is assigned and the day it is due. 
  • You can ask quick questions during homeroom every day.
  • You can give me your draft and I will go over it with you.  (No later than Wednesday, October 30th.  Remember that we will not be in school Thursday, October 31st (Tri-county trip).
c. This is the time that all of those "thinking homework" assignments either make your life easier or more complicated.  If you didn't realized the importance of "thinking homework" during the Oz unit, than you do now.  Instead of wasting your energy feeling discouraged, make appropriate changes in the way you handle your school work.  I am not only after school every Monday and Wednesday, but more than willing to show you how to get back in the game.



Take Home Exam:

Draft the following three writing prompts by Friday, November 1st, so we can revise the drafts and prepare the final typed copies by Tuesday, November 5th.

Note: An open response includes a topic sentence, background information, supporting evidence and a concluding statement.  Write your open responses the same way you wrote your response to "how does the protagonist affect the direction of the plot?"  If you are writing as we have been practicing, than you will need 15 -18 sentences to complete the response.  See me after school Monday and Wednesday for extra help.

1. Writing Prompt: Throughout the novel you have been asked to think about your "journey", your "road of yellow brick" and what "home" means to you.  We have talked about the characters' journeys, "roads of yellow brick" and how the characters understand "home".  

Now, teach me what you have learned about " journeys", "roads of yellow brick" and "home". Teaching me is writing to inform.

Hint: One approach is to manage this writing prompt by determining the theme of The Wonderful WIzard of Oz. Once you determine the theme, then, analyze (figure out) the development of that theme over the course of the novel including characters, setting and plot.  (See your class notes from Thursday, October 24th.  We completed this response during our class discussion.)


2. Writing Prompt: Choose and complete one of the bulleted questions below:
  • Who is the Scarecrow in your life? Is there a bit of the Scarecrow in you?
  • Who is the Tin Woodman in your life" Is there a bit of the Tin Woodman in you?
  • Who is the Cowardly Lion in your life? Is there a bit of the Cowardly Lion in you?
3. Writing prompt: Why is l. Frank Baum's Wonderful Wizard of Oz a reflection of life that helps us define the greater good in society?

Hint: One approach is to manage this writing prompt by determining the theme of The Wonderful WIzard of Oz.  Once you determine the theme, then, analyze (figure out) the development of that theme over the course of the novel including characters, setting and plot.

Note: If you are struggling with "a reflection of life that helps us define the greater good in society" than respond to "a reflection of life" and know that you have my permission to cross out the greater good in society part of the writing prompt. 



Review:
1. Writing Thematic Statements:
“Theme is the central message of a literary work. It is not the same as a subject, which can be expressed in a word or two: HOME, courage, survival, war, pride, etc. The theme is the idea the author wishes to convey about that subject. It is expressed as a sentence or general statement about life or human nature. A literary work can have more than one theme, and most themes are not directly stated but are implied. The reader must think about all the elements of the work and use them to make inferences, or reasonable guesses, as to which themes seem to be implied.” (from Laying the Foundation series of books published by AP Strategies in Dallas)

For example, if “home” is a topic/subject of two novels, a major theme in one of the novels could be “Home, if shared by others, can be an opportunity for us to grow not just a place to live,” while in the other novel, the theme might be “Home can be a place where we learn that the human spirit will triumph over all challenges.” Notice that the topic/subject is the same, but the messages about that topic/subject are different in different works.


2. Writing to Inform Common Core Skills:
Writing Skills.8.2. 
SWBAT write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

Writing Skills.8.2.b.
SWBAT develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.


3. MLA Citation - online:
Baum, L. Frank. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Chicago: George M. Hill Co.. 1900. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 October 2011.


4. Rubric: Writing to Inform


Periods A, D and E completed the review.

Period B lost time from the class review because of Thursday's magazine drive. Period B lost time from Friday's SuperCore because of the Pink Out photo taken in the gym last period. Yes. Students in Period B might feel like they need more information.

Getting more information begins by paying close attention during these short, disjointed classes. Paying attention is difficult especially when our routine is changed. You can do it!!! You are intelligent young adults and you can choose to do what you need to do!!!! Don't forget to use after school time if you need more information and/or extra-help.




1-oz-map.jpg Thursday, October 24th

Agenda and Homework:

1. Students will work collaboratively to determine the best overarching theme for The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

2. Students will work collaboratively to "figure out" (analyze) the development of the theme from the beginning of L. Frank Baum's novel all the way to the last page of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Note: The development of the theme is always connected to characters, setting and the plot, so when you "figure out" the overarching theme make sure you can teach me how the theme connects to the characters, the setting and the plot of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Example: 

Theme - "Importance of Home"

Background information: What does you audience need to know?
  • Background information is necessary to make sure your audience understands your point of view. Begin by identifying the theme in a sentence that let's your audience know your point of view about the theme you chose.   Then explain your understanding of "the importance of home" by making a connection to "home" not just as an explicit place but also implicitly as a way people see life.  
  • Connection to characters - Continue explaining "the importance of home" to Dorothy, Scarecrow, Tin Woodman and Cowardly Lion. 
  • Connection to setting: Let your audience know that the "road of yellow brick" is not only part of the setting, but also a symbol.  Remind your audience that symbols give every day places and objects a deeper meaning.  "The road of yellow brick" is part of the setting but it is also a "road" we all travel on through life as we find our way "home".  

    a. Scarecrow “told his story”, shared his wish, walked along "the road of yellow brick" and found "home" when he received his brain.

    b. Tin Woodman “told his story”, shared his wish, walked along the "road of yellow brick" and found "home" when he received his heart.

    c. Cowardly Lion “told his story”, shared his wish, walked "the road of yellow brick" and found "home" when he received his courage.

    d. Dorothy also “told her story”, shared his wish, walked along the “road of yellow brick" but she had to continue her journey after the other characters found "home". She had to complete more on her journey before she found “home”. In the novel Dorothy had to learn more about herself with the help of her friends. ("The Attach of the Fighting Trees", "The Dainty China Country", "Country of the Quadlings").

    e. Did the King of the Winged Monkeys “tell his story”, share his wish, walk along the “road of yellow brick” and find “home”?

  • Connection to the plot: Scan through the novel and give your audience evidence of the theme "importance of home" from the first page to the last page.

3. If you are able to work collaboratively to "figure out" the development of the overarching theme, than you will have answers to the following questions from your student unit guide:
  • Why is The Wonderful Wizard of Oz a reflection of life?

  • How can The Wonderful Wizard of Oz help us define the greater good in society?  (Hint: Can we identify the "greater good of society" as a "reflection of life?)

Reading Literature Skills.8.2.

SWBAT determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.


Reading Literature Skills.8.1.
SWBAT
cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
from the text.




1-oz-map.jpg  Wednesday, October 23rd

Agenda and Homework:

1. Class: 
a. Summarize chapters 20 and 21 as if you were tweeting the summary.  You can only use 140 characters or less. (Spaces and punctuation are characters.)
b. Identify a theme for chapters 20 and 21 from your cheat sheet of themes.

Speaking and Listening Skills.8.1.c

SWBAT Pose and answer questions in order to show accurate literal understanding of explicit referencesrelevant literary elements, 

student ideas and observations.


We rewrote the Speaking and Listening Skill to the activity we practiced during class: students will be able to answer a question posed by Ms. Turner to show accurate literal understanding of ideas in chapters 20 and 21 of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz


2. Book Fair: second half of the period

3. Homework: read chapters 22 and 23

Remember that the whole novel is due Friday.

Speaking and Listening Skills.8.1.a.
SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under studyexplicitly draw on that preparation by 
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.



1-oz-map.jpg Tuesday, October 22nd

Agenda and Homework:

1. How are you forming your learning?  (formative assessment)

a. Students will work for ten to fifteen minutes on twelve questions worth sixty points to figure out what they have learned. 

Note: 
Each student has been 
  • using the skills identified in the Common Core Standards to prepare for class, participate in class discussions, read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and share his/her ideas about this literary novel in writing             
  • reading The Wonderful Wizard of Oz so he/she can discus the explicit facts about the plot.    
  • reading The Wonderful Wizard of Oz so he/she can use the explicit facts about the novel to support his/her implicit understandings about theme and symbols and irony. 
  • trying to mature his/her reading comprehension skills by learning to read the Common Core standards.
b. Class reading of chapters 19, 20 and 21

c. Class discussion of chapters 19, 20, 21

Speaking and Listening Skills.8.1.c

SWBAT Pose and answer questions in order to show accurate literal understanding of explicit referencesrelevant literary elements,

student ideas and observations.


Reading Literature Skills.8.2.

SWBAT determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.


Reading Literature Skills.8.1.
SWBAT
cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
from the text.



2. Homework:

Tuesday, October 22nd: chapters 20 - 21
Wednesday, October 23rd: chapters 22 - 23
Thursday, October 24th: preface and chapters 1 - 24

Speaking and Listening Skills.8.1.a.
SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.



1-oz-map.jpg Monday, October 21st

Agenda and Homework:

1. Independently and with self-direction budget your time in school and out of school to manage your homework and projects.

For example: We will complete The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by  L. Frank Baum this Friday, October 25th and you will receive your take home exam which is due Tuesday, November 5th.  Have you kept up with your student unit guide? Have you begun to organize the information you need to answer the questions on the front of your student unit guide?  Have you found the excerpt and page numbers in the novel for the supporting evidence you will use to answer the questions on the front of your student unit guide?

Writing Skills.8.2.
SWBAT write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

Writing Skills.8.2.b.
SWBAT develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.


MLA Citation - online:
Baum, L. Frank. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Chicago: George M. Hill Co.. 1900. University of Virginia Library etext. Web. 1 October 2011.
                             > http://etext.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/BauWiza.html <

2. Use this guide to help you "figure out" how to finish reading chapters 17-24.  
How will you find your balance between school, home, family, friends, your health and the times you need to have fun?

Monday, October 21st: class - chapters 16 -17
Tuesday, October 22nd: class - chapters 18 - 19
Wednesday, October 23rd: class - chapters 20 - 21
Thursday, October 24th: class - chapters 22 - 23
Friday, October 25th: class - preface and chapters 1 - 24


Speaking and Listening Skills.8.1.a. 
SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by 
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.




3. DId you complete the homework/class preparation that is due today, Monday, October 21st

You have been "thinking about" and taking class notes on the following questions discussed during class.
Organize the notes you have taken during class discussions, so you are prepared for class Monday, October 21st.
  • What is your "journey?"
  • What is your "road of yellow brick" like right now in your life?
  • Where is "home?"
Note: Is "home" a place or a metaphor for our dreams, and hopes?

3b. You have been "thinking about" the following questions listed on the front of your Student Unit Guide.
Begin the writing to inform process by preparing bulleted drafts this weekend for the following Student Unit Guide Questions

Who are the people who move the plot of your life forward?
  • Who is the Scarecrow in your life?
  • Is there a bit of the Scarecrow in you?
  • Who is the Tin Woodman in your life"
  • Is there a bit of the Tin Woodman in you?
  • Who is the Cowardly Lion in your life?
  • Is there a bit of the Cowardly Lion in you?
  • Who are the witches, humbugs, and wizards in your life?
  • Is there a bit of a witch, humbug, or wizard in you?


Speaking and Listening Skills.8.1.c

SWBAT Pose and answer questions in order to show accurate literal understanding of explicit referencesrelevant literary elements,

student ideas and observations.


Reading Literature Skills.8.2.

SWBAT determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.


Reading Literature Skills.8.1.
SWBAT
cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
from the text.



4. Homework:
Monday, October 21st: chapters 18 - 19 and any other chapters you have not read, yet??? 
Tuesday, October 22nd:  chapters 20 - 21
Wednesday, October 23rd: chapters 22 - 23
Thursday, October 24th: preface and chapters 1 - 24

Speaking and Listening Skills.8.1.a.
SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.




1-oz-map.jpg  Friday, October 18th

Agenda and Homework:

1. Scroll down and review the agenda, the Common Core standards and the notes for Wednesday, September 16th and Thursday, September 17th.  Today is the third day of a three-day lesson.

2. Today we will work in collaborative groups to begin finding supporting evidence for the questions on the front of the Student Unit Guide.
Use this time wisely.  The supporting evidence is due Monday, October 21st.

3. Homework:
FInish finding the supporting evidence for the questions on the front of your student unit guide. Don't forget to include the number of the page where you found that evidence.  

Looking ahead and practicing being independent and self-directed:
If you have a busy week, plan ahead.  We have read the preface, chapters 1 - 15. Know that we will be finished reading The Wonderful WIzard of Oz next Friday, October 25th. That leaves 9 more chapters to read.  Do you need to do some extra reading this weekend.





1-oz-map.jpg Thursday, October  17

Note: Teachers are being pulled from two instructional/teaching periods today for a mandatory meeting.  The only way to manage instruct and to keep students moving forward is to give a formative assessment and then, when students finish give them time to begin finding evidence for the questions on the front of their Student Unit Guide.  

Agenda and Homework:
1. Formative Assessment: Chapters 1-15 with a string focus on Chapters 12-15.
Chapter by chapter notes to study can be found by scrolling through the following  link http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/apt5.aspx

2. When students finish the formative assessment they will hand it in and hand in the Play, Artifact, Genealogy class guide we worked on during class Tuesday and Wednesday.

3. After students hand in their work, they can borrow a novel and begin finding evidence for the questions on the front of their Student Unit Study Guides.  They will continue working with me during class Friday, October 18th to make sure everyone understands the process.  Read through the questions below.  Know these questions are the same questions on the front of the Student Unit Guide.  Students will be asked to write open responses to these questions and to include supporting evidence.  This is the first step.  Work with me and together during class to learn strategies and master the "support a topic with evidence" skill.  


Writing Skills.8.2.
SWBAT write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

Writing Skills.8.2.b.
SWBAT develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.




Homework: Due Monday, October 21st

You have been "thinking about" and taking class notes on the following questions discussed during class.
Organize the notes you have taken during class discussions, so you are prepared for class Monday, October 21st.
  • What is your "journey?"
  • What is your "road of yellow brick" like right now in your life?
  • Where is "home?"
Note: Is "home" a place or a metaphor for our dreams, and hopes?

3b. You have been "thinking about" the following questions listed on the front of your Student Unit Guide.
Begin the writing to inform process by preparing bulleted drafts this weekend for the following Student Unit Guide Questions

Who are the people who move the plot of your life forward?
  • Who is the Scarecrow in your life?
  • Is there a bit of the Scarecrow in you?
  • Who is the Tin Woodman in your life"
  • Is there a bit of the Tin Woodman in you?
  • Who is the Cowardly Lion in your life?
  • Is there a bit of the Cowardly Lion in you?
  • Who are the witches, humbugs, and wizards in your life?
  • Is there a bit of a witch, humbug, or wizard in you?




1-oz-map.jpg    Wednesday, October 16

Agenda and Homework:

1. Play, artifact, genealogy and homework

a. Remind students to complete yesterday's "play, artifact, genealogy" classroom guide by tomorrow, Thursday, October 17th.
b. Remind students; Thursday or Friday there will be another 50 point formative assessment - review chapters 1-15.
c. Why were you asked to "play"?
  • Playing was an opportunity to explore the importance of good health as part of your educational success
  • Playing was an opportunity to tap into your imagination, your five senses and your ability to laugh
  • Playing was preparation for writing (writing to inform, descriptive writing and narrative writing


2. Oz: Chapters 12-15 (Student Unit Guide)
Chapter XII (12): "The Search for the Wicked Witch"
Chapter XIII (13): "The Discovery of Oz, the Terrible"
Chapter XIV (14): "The Winged Monkeys"
Chapter XV (15): "The Art of the Great Humbug"

a. MLA Citation - Hardcopy: 
Baum, Lyman Frank. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. New York: Dover Publications, 1960. Print.

b. MLA Citation online University of Virginia 
resource that includes page numbers:
Baum, L. Frank. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Chicago: George M. Hill Co.. 1900. University of Southern Florida Extension for Instructional
         Technology etext. Web. 1 October 2012. >
http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/authors/29/l-frank-baum/<

c. Detailed class notes can be found by scrolling down this link http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/apt5.aspx

d. Massachusetts Common Core:
Prepare for class discussions by identifying one interesting and one confusing topic for each chapter.

Speaking and Listening Skills.8.1.c 

SWBAT  Pose and answer questions in order to show accurate literal understanding of explicit referencesrelevant literary elements,

student ideas and observations.


Speaking and Listening Skills.8.1.a.
SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

Reading Literature Skills.8.2.

SWBAT determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.


Reading Literature Skills.8.1.
SWBAT
cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
from the text.


3. Homework: Due Monday, October 21st

You have been "thinking about" and taking class notes on the following questions discussed during class.  
Organize the notes you have taken during class discussions, so you are prepared for class Monday, October 21st.  
  • What is your "journey?"
  • What is your "road of yellow brick" like right now in your life?
  • Where is "home?"
Note: Is "home" a place or a metaphor for our dreams, and hopes?

3b. You have been "thinking about" the following questions listed on the front of your Student Unit Guide.  
Begin the writing to inform process by preparing bulleted drafts this weekend for the following Student Unit Guide Questions

Who are the people who move the plot of your life forward?
  • Who is the Scarecrow in your life?
  • Is there a bit of the Scarecrow in you?
  • Who is the Tin Woodman in your life"
  • Is there a bit of the Tin Woodman in you?
  • Who is the Cowardly Lion in your life?
  • Is there a bit of the Cowardly Lion in you?
  • Who are the witches, humbugs, and wizards in your life?
  • Is there a bit of a witch, humbug, or wizard in you?


3c. Massachusetts Common Core:. Topic Development: literature, Informational Text and Writing

Topic Development:
Speaking and Listening Skills.8.1.a.
SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

Reading Literature Skills.8.2.

SWBAT determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.


Reading Literature Skills.8.1.
SWBAT
cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
from the text.

Writing Skills.8.2.
SWBAT write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

Writing Skills.8.2.b.
SWBAT develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.



1-oz-map.jpg Tuesday, October 15

Agenda and Homework:

1. Play, Artifact, Genealogy Notes - first week (due Tuesday after Thanksgiving)
  • Breaking down and managing long term projects while practicing expository, descriptive and narrative writing skills
  • SWBAT use Massachusetts Common Core Writing Expository (PDF) skills and strategies to write and justify expositions, descriptions and narratives.

2. Chapter 13: "The Discovery of Oz, The Terrible"

a. Class Discussion:
  • Speaking and Listening L.8.1.a.
    SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by
    referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
  • SL.8.1.c SWBAT Pose and answer questions in order to show accurate literal understanding of explicit references to relevant literary elements,

    student ideas and observations.

  • Reading Literature.8.1. 
    SWBAT
    cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn 
    from the text.


b. Detailed Notes -
Click on the link
and scroll down to chapter 15 notes:.

SWBAT use the Massachusetts Common Core Reading Literature (PDF skills and strategies to read/watch dramatic screenplays/film.
  • Documenting supporting evidence for Irony Literary term -irony - used in the context of the novel)
  • Discovering the Qualities, Beliefs and Assumptions of characters (Literary term: Four Methods an Author Uses to Create Characters)
  • Determining theme with supporting evidence

3. Homework: Chapter 14 "The Winged Monkeys"

Click on the link
and scroll down to chapter 16 notes.

SWBAT use the Massachusetts Common Core Reading Literature (PDF skills and strategies to read/watch dramatic screenplays/film.

SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

Reading Literature.8.1.
SWBAT
cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
from the text.







1-pumpkins.jpg Monday, October 14th - Columbus - Day No School:) -  Go Outside and Play!!!!





1-oz-map.jpg  Friday, October 11

Agenda:

1. Quick Formative Check 

a. Literary Terms and Figurative Language
b. Replacing Directions With Common Core Standards
c. Using Evidence to Suport Theme Choices


2. Chapter 12: "The Search For the Wicked Witch"

a. What is the Rule of Three?
b. What evidence did we find in chapter 12 that supports a definition of the literary term, Rule of THree"


3. Q&A: Play, Artifact, Genealogy

a. We are beginning our first long-term project: Play, Artifact, and Genealogy.  
b. While this project will be due the Tuesday after Thanksgiving weekend, students are responsible for weekly checkpoints.  Why?  The weekly checkpoints are designed to teach students how to manage a long-term project by breaking it down into manageable parts.
c. Tuesday, October 15th is the first checkpoint. Students are expected to bullet short notes about the "play" experience, the "artifact" and the information - genealogy - they are getting about family by interviewing family members. 

Notes:
a. Students have been asked to "play" for two hours without using any form of technology, motorized vehicles, paintball guns, etc.  Why? By the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, each student will practice descriptive writing skills and writing to inform skills by describing and explaining the "play" experience that they used their imaginations to create.

b. Each student has been asked to explore and discover an "artifact" that is meaningful - significant - to him or her.  This exploration and discovery will be completed by the Tuesday after Thanksgiving in the form of a writing assignment.  The writing assignment will give students an opportunity to practice the following writing skills: identifying, describing and explaining 
 
c. Finally, 
students are beginning to explore the following question: 
  • Who am I?
  • From where do I come?
  • Where am I going?
  • What is the right thing to do?
While interviewing family members to discover the names and birth dates of family members, students are beginning to explore the what is means to "research" as Zora Neale Hurston defines: "Research is formalized curiosity."  This is not an easy process!  Families are awesome,  challenging, loving, confusing, comical, annoying and finding the names can be a difficult process.  During class, we discussed the process of discovering this information.  
"You might not be able to find some names and birth dates.  Just do the best you can and explore that which is comfortable for you. Just TRY!!!"


Friday, October 11, 2013 Newsletter:

The 8th grade is half way through L. Frank Baum's, Wonderful Wizard of Oz and our journey along "the road of yellow brick." Students have worked together to investigate the ironic characteristics of Scarecrow, Tin Woodman, and Cowardly Lion. How can Scarecrow solve so many problems, when he truly believes he does not have a brain? How can Tin Woodman care for his friends, when he truly believes he does not have a heart? How can Cowardly

Lion protect his friends, when he truly believes he does not have any courage? Students continued to gather evidence to prove whether or not the "road of yellow brick" might be a major symbol; to prove "going home" might be the major them of this novel.

Ask your children to teach you something about irony or symbols or a possible theme. While we have been discussing the Hurricane of ’38 and L. Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, students have been practicing Speaking and Listening, Reading Informational Texts and Reading Literature skills and strategies.

Reading Literature.8.2. SWBAT determine a theme or central idea of a text. Analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

Reading Literature.8.1. SWBAT cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn from the text.




1-oz-map.jpg Thursday, October 10

Agenda:

1. Class: 

a. The assessments listed on the progress reports are Identified.  
Students participate in a Q&A discussion, so they can explain the progress report to parents/guardians.

b. Final Review and in-class reading: chapters I - XI  (1 - 11)

c. Reminder: formative assessment - see class notes from Tuesday, October 8th.


2. Homework:

a. Read Chapter XII (12) "The Search For the Wicked Witch"  (Listening time - 20:32 minutes)

b. Student Unit Guide Reflection:
  • Identify the theme you believe is the best theme for this novel  
    (See class notes - Monday and Tuesday October 7th and 8th)
  • Identify an excerpt from the chapter to support you theme choice

3. Review Common Core Standards - Scroll down and review Tuesday, October 8th online notes.








1-oz-map.jpg Tuesday, October 8


a. Class Discussion: Review chapter I-XI (1-11)

Prepare for class discussions by identifying one interesting and one confusing topic for each chapter.

Speaking and Listening L.8.1.a. 
SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

Reading Literature.8.1.  
SWBAT 
cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
from the text.



b. Homework: Review notes for chapter I-XI (1-11) - due Thursday, September 10th

Homework is a time to practice the following skills and learning strategies.
Use the link, scroll down and review chapter notes: http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/apt5.aspx


Speaking and Listening L.8.1.a. 
SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

Reading Literature.8.1.  
SWBAT 
cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
from the text.


c.  Topic Development: literature, Informational Text and Writing 


Note: We will be practicing many skills this year. Topic development is one of those skills.  We will explore identifying themes in literature identifying central ideas in informational texts and developing central ideas in writing.


Reading Literature.8.2.

SWBAT determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.


Reading Literature.8.1. 
SWBAT 
cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
from the text.



Reading Informational Texts.8.2.  
SWBAT 
determine a central idea of a text. SWBAT analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas.

Reading Informational Texts.8.1.  
SWBAT cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.



Writing.8.2. 
SWBAT write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

Writing.8.2.b. 
SWBAT develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.


1-oz-map.jpg Monday, October 7th

Finally!  We can begin instruction again and continue with l. Frank Baum's Wonderful Wizard of Oz.


1. Oz homework reminder - scroll down to Wednesday, October 2nd

2. Agenda

a. Class Discussions are a time to practice the following skills and learning strategies.

SL.8.1.c  SWBAT Pose and answer questions in order to show accurate literal understanding of explicit references to relevant literary elements, 

student ideas and observations.

RL.8.1. SWBAT cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn 
from the text.



b. Do your homework by preparing for class discussions.  Identify one interesting and one confusing topic for each chapter.
The following skills are a helpful way to know how to prepare for class discussions.

This preparation could have been the foundation for a lively class discussion for which we tried to make time.  Unfortunately the Galileo testing mandated by the curriculum director was not complete.  However, today is a new day and we will begin our discussion!!!

SL.8.1.a. SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

RL.8.1. SWBAT cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
from the text.

Chapter VII (7) "Journey to the Great Oz"

Chapter VIII (8) "The Deadly Poppy Field"

Chapter IX (9) "Queen of the Field Mice"

Chapter X (10) "Guardian of the Gates"

Chapter XI (11) "The Wonderful Emerald City of Oz"


3. Reading Literature


a. We will be practicing many skills this year. Topic development is one of those skills.


Reading Literature.8.2. 

SWBAT determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.


b. Use the link, scroll down and review chapter notes: http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/apt5.aspx

c. Pay particular attention to find the supporting evidence that will help you begin to "determine a theme and figure out the development of that theme over the course of the text".
  • pages 26-27 in Chapter 2 "The Council WIth the Munchkins"
  • page 44-45 in Chapter 4 "The Road Through the Forest"






-1-seek-icon.jpg Friday, October 4

We cannot begin any lessons until all students have completed the mandated Galileo online standardized test.


Galileo is a standardized test.

Please don't confuse a standardized test with the Father of Modern Science, Galileo Galilei.

Galileo Galilei, the Father of Modern Science, was a scientist,astronomer, mathematician, inventor, philosopher born in Pisa, Italy February 15, 1564. He played a major role in the Scientific Revolution. At one point in his life Galileo was charged with heresy because he supported the Copernican theory and challenged Aristotle's doctrine and the belief's of the church. He faced the Inquisition and was found guilty. Interestingly enough Galileo remained true to his scientific findings even though he was found guilty and placed under house arrest after the trial.


-1-seek-icon.jpg Thursday, October 3

Galileo is a standardized test.

Please don't confuse a standardized test with the Father of Modern Science, Galileo Galilei.

Galileo Galilei, the Father of Modern Science, was a scientist,astronomer, mathematician, inventor, philosopher born in Pisa, Italy February 15, 1564.  He played a major role in the Scientific Revolution.  At one point in his life Galileo was charged with heresy because he supported the Copernican theory and challenged Aristotle's doctrine and the belief's of the church.  He faced the Inquisition and was found guilty.  Interestingly enough Galileo remained true to his scientific findings even though he was found guilty and placed under house arrest after the trial.  




1-oz-map.jpg Wednesday, October 2

1. Making Connections: Common Core Topic Development Skills and Strategies

Reading Informational Texts.8.2. SWBAT determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.

Reading Literature.8.2. SWBAT determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

Writing.8.2. SWBAT write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.


2.  Class Discussion: Interesting/Confusing topics from chapters 4, 5 and 6

SL.8.1a  SWBAT Pose and answer questions in order to show accurate literal understanding of explicit references to relevant literary elements, 

student ideas and observations.  

 

RL.8.1. SWBAT cite the textual evidence  that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
 from the text. 
   


IV. "Road Through the Forest"

V. "Rescue of the Tin Woodman"

VI. "The Cowardly Lion"

Discussion notes: 
During our discussion of "interesting and confusing" topics, we discovered that
a. we were actually ANALYZING the chapters.
b. we were discovering the meaning of IRONY
c. we were using symbols like the road of yellow brick to ANALYZE the "going home" theme. 
d. vocabulary that was once part of the vernacular, but now have a different connotation.

Vocabulary: vernacular, connotation, denotation



3. Homework:

a. Galileo Online Test - Thursday, October 3rd  

Note: Students will not be allowed to use a hard copy of the test - a mandate by the curriculum director.

Note: This is the first of five mandated Galileo online standardized tests



b. Oz due Friday, October 4th

Reading chapters 7 and 8. Prepare one interesting and one confusing topic for each chapter.  
This preparation is the foundation for a lively class discussion Friday, October 4th.

SL.8.1.a. SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by 
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

RL.8.1. SWBAT cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
from the text.


Chapter VII (7) "Journey to the Great Oz"

Chapter VIII (8) "The Deadly Poppy Field"




c. Oz due Monday, October 7th

Reading chapters 9-11.  Prepare one interesting and one confusing topic for each chapter. 
This preparation is the foundation for a lively class discussion Friday, October 4th.

SL.8.1.a. SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by 
referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

RL.8.1. SWBAT cite the textual evidence that strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly and supports the inferences drawn
from the text.
Chapter IX (9) "Queen of the Field Mice"

Chapter X (10) "Guardian of the Gates"

Chapter XI (11) "The Wonderful Emerald City of Oz"





1-choice-is-ours.jpg Tuesday, October 1

1. Students practiced assessing the work they have completed.  These assessments include a grade, but more importantly a "story".   

What does it mean to juxtapose a story with a number?

"Numbers" are exactly that simply "numbers" and when numbers - alone - are used to grade student work, then a student becomes defined by that number.  For example, when a student earns a 70 for the work he/she completed for an assignment, that student quickly defines him or herself.  How awful - the fact that a student is profiled by a number - alone.  

Why is the narrative, the "story" important.  It is through the "story" that a student understands that he/she is more important than a number.  It is through the "story" that a student learns what to do to earn a different number.   

This year students will be graded with a number and a narrative, s story.   

 

2. Homework:

Students will continue to review the preface and chapters 1-6.  http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/apt5.aspx

Why?  

a. Students can use the notes on the Oz page to check the quality of their own note-taking skills.

b. Students are learning that all assessments are designed from the notes on this site and the written response to "thinking" homework.  

What is thinking homework?  

Wednesday, September 25th we discussed a definition for "research" that was based on a Zora Neale Hurston quote:


"Research is formalized curiosity. It is poking and prying with a purpose." Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road


That night 

students we asked to begin "thinking" about a response to that definition of research.  




3. Assessments vs. Standardized test (Galileo)

Within the etymology of the word "assessment" one would find an experience.  The experience is the opportunity to sit with another and listen to that other person.  Sadly, in this day and age the connotation of the word "assessment" is a number and fear.  

What ever happened to "sitting beside and listening to another"?

Know that I clearly define assessment as a "time to sit with and listen to" students.  It is a time to hear a student's "story".

Tests, on the other hand, are a number, a score.  Testing is a time to help students manage anxiety and fear, among many other challenges that go hand in hand with standardized testing, especially the new mandated, online standardized test.

In an attempt to begin the preparation process for these mandated, online standardized tests, I developed this site. I also included technolgy/hard copy as part of a student's choice when deciding how he/she will read novels in my class.

While there were many reasons I chose to develop this site more than ten years ago, preparation for taking online, standardized tests was one.  Even back then the hand-writing was on the wall: one day all tests would be given online.  

Scrolling through and "figuring out" this site is one way students can practice for these online standardized tests.  Five years ago the 8th grade curriculum included "choice" with respect to reading novels.  Students could choose to read a hard copy of the novel or students could choose to use technology and read the novel online.  This choice gives students another opportunity to practice online reading skills in preparation for the inevitable online standardized test.  

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts is piloting the online PARCC test this year and next year with the intent to replace the MCAS test with the PARCC test the following year. However, students in Seekonk are being mandated to take the Galileo online standardized test this year and they must do so without a hard copy.  

Let me take a moment and go back to the discussion about grades.  This mandated online Galileo test is a perfect example why students should know more than a number, a grade.  Each students should know his/her "story".  It is too easy to reduce our young adults to a number and they are so much more!  

I only wish every one could visit with me in the classroom for at least a month.  You would leave after that month feeling confident about all of our futures.  8th grade students are inspirational, curious, just plain funny, silly, serious, empathetic, willing to listen to anyone who is willing to listen to them.  In other words, I get up every morning knowing I am one of the most fortunate people on this earth because I get to spend time with - "sit beside and listen to" - 8th grade young adults.  

It is in the "story" - their stories - that our global community with thrive!







September

1-choice-is-ours.jpg Monday, September 30


1. We are using today to "catch up" and complete any unfinished assignments.



2. Students "broke down" the Common Core standards listed on the front of the Oz student unit guide.

  AWESOME JOB!!!

This was a formative assessment that gave me a chance to see first hand how students were forming their ides.

What specific ideas, you might ask? Reading comprehension and reading literature!

You see, if students can break down the Common Core standards so they can read these standards and "figure out" what to do, than students will also have the skills they need to read the more complicated texts they will have to read in high school and college.

We actually went one step further. While students highlighted and chunked the big ideas, we took time to underline details so we wouldn't forget to include these specific details in our discussions or our writing.



3. Once students were finished with the highlighting and underlining, than they began another formative assessment. They worked with the Common Core standards for reading informational texts. They used the "How Tornadoes Form" transcript to prove to themselves and to me that they can find central ideas, concluding statements, supporting details, points of view and specific word choice.

We will continue and finish this formative assessment. Students gave me their work before leaving class so I will be able to read through it tonight before we complete the exercise tomorrow.

a. It is difficult not only to identify a central idea and to identify the topic sentence that clearly states the central idea.

b. It is difficult to identify the conclusion and to include supporting evidence from the informational text.

c. Points of view are a challenge, but students are doing well and are identifying points of view.

d. Providing supporting evidence for the central idea seems to be the place where we will begin tomorrow. While many students seem to understand how to manage this skill, others are still struggling. That's OK:) We are here to learn and I can tell you that our students are working very hard!!!




4. Homework:

a. Due not read any new chapters tonight!

b. Review the Preface through Chapter VI (6) "Cowardly Lion"

  • Scroll down to the Preface and keep scrolling thought Chapter VI (6) "The Cowardly Lion"
  • Do not stress out and memorize the notes under each chapter.
  • Instead, read through the notes and remember that every test given will come from those notes.
  • Know the resources available to you and use your learning style to prepare for class and tests.


5. Galileo 

Thursday, October 4th, students will be mandated to take the Galileo English pretest.

Teachers are mandated to proctor the test without giving students scrap paper or hard copies of the test.

Students will be mandated to take four more Galileo English tests before the end of the year for a total of five English tests or a loss of ten teaching days because a make-up day must be included for each of the five English tests.

Galileo tests are mandated not only in English, but also math and science.

A quick math total:

5 Galileo tests
+ (plus) an extra day per test for make-up tests
X (times) 3 core classes (math, science and English)
equals 30 days blocked off for Galileo testing in the course of an academic year of 180 days.

Now subtract MCAS tests and a trial PARCC test from the 180 days.








1-oz-map.jpg   Friday, September 27

Class Agenda:

1. We practiced auditory learning skills today.  Notes were taken without the use of the LCD projector and Screen.

2. Galileo Test:
Students were reminded that Thursday, October 3rd, I am mandated to give a standardized English test and I will not be allowed to give students a hard copy of the test.  The test must be taken online without the use of a hard copy.  This will be nothing like the MCAS.  Students are given a hard copy of the MCAS test and are allowed to highlight, underline and annotate notes on the hard copy.  

The Galileo test will require a great deal of online reading, scrolling back and forth through each online text to answer questions as well as many other challenges.  The concerns of many educators: Will this be an accurate measure of a student's knowledge or a measure of the difficulties encountered when taking an online test?

3.  The science Galileo was administer today and because of technical difficulties and the stress of testing online, our English class was a review of past materials - Preface through Chapter 4.  


4. Oftentimes the title of a chapter is hinting at the central idea of the chapter.

During class we practiced trying to figure out what the central idea and main topics were within each chapter by using the title of the chapter as a "reminder."  Once we figured out the central idea and the main topics, we knew we could write a brief summary.  Think back to class.  Can you summarize each chapter by using the chapter title to remind you what the central idea and main topics were?  Can you do this on your own?  If not, than you should stay after school Monday and/or Wednesday next week and work on these skills.

I. "The Cyclone"  

II "The Council WIth the Munchkins"

III. "How Dorothy Sved the Scarecrow"

IV. "Road Through the Forest"

V. "Rescue of the Tin Woodman"

VI. "The Cowardly Lion"


Hint: MCAS Connection: Often times the title of the article you read on an MCAS reminds you of the central idea of the article.

5. Homework: 
a. Chapters 5 and 6 are due Monday, September 30.
Don't forget to include the "interesting and confusing" topics on your student unit guide.

b. Student Unit Guides will be checked/graded Tuesday, October 1 and/or Wednesday, October 2.
c. If you have a busy week with activities out side of school or many projects due in other classes, budget your time.  

Think Ahead and learning to become an independent self-directed student:
Know that we will be reading the following chapters 
  • Chapter VII (7): "Journey to the Great Oz"
  • Chapter VIII (8): "The Deadly Poppy Field"
  • Chapter IX (9): "The Chapter X (10): "Queen of the Field Mice"
  • Chapter X (10): " The Guardian of the Gates"
Note: Pay special attention to the chapter notes for Chapter X (10) posted on the OZ page. (irony, symbolism reviewed, and predicting themes)

Click on the following link  http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/apt5.aspx and scroll down to Chapter X (10).

d. Correction: Ryan found a mistake on the student unit guide: Tin Woodsman should be Tin Woodman without the "s".  Thanks, Ryan:)



1-oz-map.jpg Thursday, September 26

Class:

1. We reviewed homework from the student unit guides by continuing our discussion about the "Interesting/confusing" topics in L. Frank Baum's Wonderful Wizard of Oz.  Last night's homework was reading chapter 4 and identifying one "interesting" and one "confusing" topic.
Today's discussion begins with chapter 3.


2. Click on this link  http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/apt5.aspx  to view the National Geographic video "How Tornadoes Form"  and MGM's film clip about the tornado.   Scroll down to chapter one/introduction.

During class we compared the science of the formation of a tornado with L. Frank Baum's description of the tornado and MGM studio's film clip of the tornado.  It was just a beginning and we have more work to do tomorrow to finish the comparisons.


3. Homework: 
Read chapter 4
Prepare for tomorrow's discussion by identifying one interesting and one confusing topic from chapter 4.  
Write your "interesting/confusing"  reflections on your student unit guide.


Check your understanding for each chapter by previewing The Wonderful Wizard of Oz notes.  Click on this link and scroll down the the chapter and notes you need:)    http://teacherweb.com/MA/DrKevinMHurleyMiddleSchool/dsturner/apt5.aspx



1-oz-map.jpg Wednesday, September 25

Class Agenda:

1. Research: Are you curious?


"Research is formalized curiosity. It is poking and prying with a purpose." Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road

Zora Neale Hurston, an author, "figured out" that which she did not know.  It is this kind of curiosity that drives a person to know more.


 

2. Purpose: Why do you come to school?

 

 

" 'Maybe it's the same with people,' Hugo continued. 'If you loose your purpose ...it's like you're broken.' " p374 - Brian Selznick, Hugo Cabret


3. Class 
a. Our opening discussion was based on the "interesting and confusing" topics student discovered while reading chapter 2 last night.
b. Students are expected to take notes during this discussion and identify 3 more "interesting" and 3 more "confusing" topics while they listen to others.  

Note:  Why we do what we do: Speaking and Listening Skills

SL.8.1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

   a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to

   evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

   b. Follow rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual 

   roles as needed.

   c. Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant evidence,

   observations, and ideas.

   d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views in light of the evidence 

   presented.




4. Homework


As you scroll down the Oz page, you will find the following topics:

  • reading resources
  • illustrations
  • skills and strategies (Students will be able to...)
Literary Terms - Scroll down to pages 92-104: http://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/ela/0311.pdf
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
  • writing resources (Students will be able to...)
  • "Research is formalized curiosity. It is poking and prying with a purpose." Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road

  • class notes - having a purpose: novel
    " 'Maybe it's the same with people,' Hugo continued. 'If you loose your purpose ...it's like you're broken.' " p374 - Brian Selznick, Hugo Cabret

  • class notes - having a purpose: film/novel comparison
    " 'Maybe it's the same with people,' Hugo continued. 'If you loose your purpose ...it's like you're broken.' " p374 - Brian Selznick, Hugo Cabret

It is up to you to keep careful notes during class and review your notes and/or continue the class discussion with friends after school.

Your education is yours. Your education is more than the passing of a standardized test. Your education is filled with the possibilities of thinking for yourself after careful study, listening to others with empathy and understanding, and sharing your unique thoughts with grace and dignity. No one can give you an education but YOU:)





1-oz-map.jpg Tuesday, September 24

Class:

1. Introduction
Take out your student unit guide and find the interesting/confusing reflection. You wrote these reflections after you read the introduction and Chapter 1 "The Cyclone" of L. Frank Baum's Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

Note: As an aside, we discussed:
  • As of April, 2009, titles of novels are italicized not underlined.
  • As of April, 2009, Chapters within a novel are noted by quotation marks.  
  • As of April, 2009, MLA citations must include the media format.  In this case the MLA citations ends with "print" which means that this Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a hard copy novel.

2a. Common Core Speaking and Listening Standard:


SL.8.1.a. SWBAT come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.



3. Homework: 

a. Prepare for class discussion by reading Chapter 3. 
b. Prepare for class discussion by identifying parts of chapter 2 that are "interesting and/or confusing" to you."
c. You will be able to draw on your preparation during class if you use the reflection column on your student unit guide to identify the "interesting and confusing" parts .

WHOOHOO:  you have not only completed your homework, but also practice SL.8.1.a and will be prepared for class tomorrow:)





1-H38.jpg  Monday, September 23


Class Agenda: 
I. Friday, we reviewed why we do what we do.  We will continue this discussion as we rotate through SuperCore.

Preview of SuperCore discussion:
A. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts requires all 8th grade educators to teach 5 groups of skills:  

Massachusetts Common Core Rubrics for 8th Grade English

B. Know that we will continue to study literary terms

Literary Terms - Scroll down to pages 92-104: http://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/ela/0311.pdf
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education


C. We will study the Common Core skills and the literary terms within the context of writing and reading.

For example, we study five specific units throughout the year and continually review the most difficult skills. The five Common Core standards are woven into each of the units to make sure each student has the opportunity not only to learn the skills but also to become comfortable with his or her knowledge of these skills.  

1. Oz unit including speaking and listening skills,  informational text, fiction, language and writing
2. Sleepy Hollow unit including speaking and listening skills, informational text, fiction, language and writing
3. Dickens unit including speaking and listening skills, informational text, fiction, language and writing
4. Lion King unit including speaking and listening skills, informational text, fiction, language and writing
5. Twain unit including speaking and listening skills, informational text, fiction, language and writing

We also use our time during SuperCore to research and prepare a travel guide for the real and virtual Washington, D.C. trip.

D. Last, but not least, we bring each of the five units together in May and June to discover the diversity in literature while Ms. Murgo, Mrs. Pellegrino and Mrs. Ditrolio explore diversity in science, social studies and math. 

If students practice and learn the Common Core skills, than students will have the critical thinking skills to do well on any standardized test to earn the grade.  More importantly, each student will have the critical thinking skills to do well in life.  However, it is up to the student to practice these skills each and every day during our class discussions, each evening when he or she is completing homework preparation for class, and every time we draft and finalize writing to inform. 


 
II. We finished watching the "Hurricane of '38" and students worked collaboratively to complete the informational text graphic organizer.



C. Homework: 

1. Complete tonight's interesting/confusing reflection on your Oz student unit guide after you read the introduction and chapter on of L. Frank Baum's Wonderful Wizard of Oz.


2. Go to the Oz page on this site and scroll down to "introduction and chapter one" to find detailed notes.




1-choice-is-ours.jpg   Friday, September 20


1. Class Agenda: Review 

a. You are so AWESOME!!!!   Thank you for all the hard work you have done learning about what it means to be in the first year of a high school English class in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts:)

b. Summer reading was designed to help you review the basic elements of fiction, informational text, nonfiction, media and illustration.
  • Fiction
  • informational text and nonfiction
  • Media
  • Illustrations
c. Writing to inform and using textual evidence to support your point of view

You wrote an open response  draft during class on Friday, September 13  (Writing Prompt: How does the protagonist affect the direction of the plot?)

You practiced using a rubric to begin thinking about how you would revise that draft (Monday, September 16th)

You began the revision process by comparing what you wrote in your draft and how you would revise what you wrote.  (Week of September 16, 17, 18, 19)


d. Breaking down statements into manageable parts  (Week of September 16, 17, 18, 19)

Examples:

W.8.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, 

organization, and analysis of relevant content.

 


SL SWBAT Pose and answer questions in order to show accurate literal understanding of explicit references to elements of social, cultural and historical context.



e. Understanding the parts of a documentary film - "Hurricane of '38"   (Wednesday, September 18 through Friday, September 20)  

Students will be able to…

RI.8.1. Cite the textual evidence 

RI.8.2. Determine a central idea of a text

RI.8.3. Identify the connections between and among people, places, and ideas. 

RI.8.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases 

RI.8.4 SWBAT identify figurative language. 

RI.8.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text. 

RI.8.7. Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums 



2. Homework:

a. Make-up word due to absence from school
If you were absent, than you have work to do based on the work you missed.  However, the first two weeks of school were devoted to teaching skills based on the Common Core standard.  You can come in Monday after school for extra-help to learn these standards.

b. Think!!!

If you have a busy week next week, than you might choose to do some reading this weekend.  We will be reading the introduction to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum through chapter 6 next week.



1-H38.jpg   Thursday, September 19

1. Agenda:

a. homework review: 
Revising "How does the protagonist affect the direction of the plot? - Identify any definitions and quotes you included in your original draft or identify that you forgot to include definitions and quotes as part of your supporting evidence.


b.  Class notes:  We used the following Common Core standard to frame the introductory notes for the documentary "Hurricane of '38".  

SL SWBAT Pose and answer questions in order to show accurate literal understanding of explicit references to

1. elements of social context visible in the documentary

  • 1938 period music
  • 1939 fashion
  • 1939 children's games and home life, including pay and jobs
  • 1939 automobiles
  • 1939 news reel footage
  • 1939 family photographs
  • 1939 oral tradition stories
  • 1939 communication (newspapers, radios, no many telephones, absolutely no weather radar) 

2. elements of cultural context

  • Impact of a novel published in 1900, a film produced in 1939 and the number of films, movies, salable products still present in 2013
  • Impact of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz on the American vernacular
  • Authors, screen-writers and advertisers alluding to dialogue, symbols and themes from the original 1900 The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and MGM's 1939 Wizard of Oz

3. elements of historical context

  • 1929 Stock Market Crash
  • Great Depression
  • moving from the Great Depression into World War II


c. PBS documentary: "Hurricane of '38"  - collect notes while watching the film documentary
Hint: Use the note-taking handout to help you organize your notes.  




d. Homework:

Periods C, D, E
Use the transcript to clarify the notes you took during class today.
Hint: To clarify means to add specific details to the general notes you took while watching the documentary film.

Period A;
Use the transcript we worked with during class to identify:
  • 3 blocks of information that best identify examples of social context
  • 3 blocks of information that best identify examples of historical context




1-H38.jpg     Wednesday, September 18


1. Class opening exercises:

Last night's homework becomes the opening reflections and exercises for class.

Homework: Tuesday, September 17:

a. Think about the essential question: Do you inherit a self or do you create a self? Figure out how you could answer that question.

b. Think about the revision strategies we talked about in class today. How will you revise the topic sentence and concluding sentence that you wrote for Friday's open response: How does the protagonist affect the direction of the plot?

c. Review: If you did not check out the Hurricane of "38 page on this site, than do so by tomorrow. Identify at least one resource that will be helpful to you when we study the Oz unit.



2. Class: PBS "Hurricane of '38" documentary film.  


a. The following note-taking guide is the same one that you were given in class to help you organize your notes.



b. The "Hurricane of "38" transcript was another tool you were given to use during class.

PBS transcript: "
Hurricane of '38"


c. Learn more about the National Weather Service:

PBS Hurricane of '38: A Brief History of the National Weather Service




3. Massachusetts Common Core Standards identify the skills we practice during class.

Note: We will be working with the following Massachusetts Common Core standards throughout this unit.  These identify the skills you are learning.  Check your notes. These are the standards we have been breaking down during class, when we use the hig lighters.

Continue to address Speaking/Listening and Language Common Core Frameworks

SL SWBAT Pose and answer questions in order to show accurate literal understanding of explicit references to elements of social, cultural and historical context. 

 


Begin learning more about reading an informational text.

Students will be able to…

RI.8.1. Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.8.2. Determine a central idea of a text. SWBAT analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas.

RI.8.3. Identify the connections between and among people, places, and ideas. Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., comparisons, analogies, or categories).

RI.8.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. SWBAT analyze the impact of specific figurative language choices on meaning and tone.

RI.8.4 SWBAT identify figurative language. SWBAT analyze the impact of specific figurative language choices on meaning and tone.

RI.8.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text. SWBAT analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.

RI.8.7. Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic.




4. Homework:

Review, organize and re-write if necessary the notes you took during class today.



1-H38.jpg   Tuesday, September 17, 2013

1. Agenda:
a. Reminder: Open House begins at 6PM 
b. Reading Massachusetts Common Core Rubrics (lesson)
c. Hurricane of ’38 and Oz Student Unit guide (handouts)
d. Hurricane of ’38 introduction (handout)
e. TeacherWeb.com homework: Identify one interest and/or helpful resource you can use because of the Hurricane of ’38 page. (activity)
f. Begin: Documentary - "Hurricane of "38"  (activity)


2. Reading Massachusetts Common Core Standards:

Class example 1:

W.8.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, 

organization, and analysis of relevant content.

 


"W.8.2."   is a Massachusetts Common Core writing standard that has four parts.

First Part: "

Write informative/explanatory texts" means you are writing to inform someone of a topic. 

 

Second Part: Remember that before you can EXAMINE a topic, you must IDENTIFY that topic. : “to examine a topic”   

Third Part: How do we examine the topic?: “by identifying ideas, concepts, and information”

Fourth Part: How do we identify ideas?:

  • by selecting the important facts,
  • organizing the important facts, and
  • "figuring out" which facts are relevant


Class example 2:

W.8.2. b. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

W.8.2.b. helps us figure out how to DEVELOP A TOPIC.  


Last week, I ask you to think about this question:  What does our audience need to know before we can answer any question?

When you answer that questions you are giving your audience background information that includes: 

a. relevant, well-chosen facts, 

b. definitions, concrete details

c. quotations

 


3. Homework:  The following information is noted on your student unit guide in the reflection column.

a. Think about the essential question: Do you inherit a self or do you create a self?  Figure out how you could answer that question.

b. Think about the revision strategies we talked about in class today.  How will you revise the topic sentence and concluding sentence that you wrote for Friday's open response: How does the protagonist affect the direction of the plot?

c. Review: If you did not "check out" the Hurricane of "38 page on this site, than do so by tomorrow.  Identify at least one resource that will be helpful to you when we study the Oz unit.






1-choice-is-ours.jpg    Monday, September 16

How to read "monster sentences: 

1. The following is a monster sentence. 

W.8.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.



2. We can read this sentence and complete the work if we learn how to break the sentence into manageable parts.


W.8.2. Write informative/explanatory texts    to examine a topic .   convey/identify ideas, concepts, and information   because we have selected 

the important facts, organized the important facts into a paragraph and analyzed/"figured out" what is relevant content


Standard W.8.2. has four distinct parts.

1. Write informative/explanatory texts.

2. Why:  to examine a topic.

3. How do we examine the topic?:  by identifying ideas, concepts, and information.

4. How do we identify ideas?: 
  • by selecting the important facts, 
  • organizing the important facts, 
  • and "figuring out" which facts are relevant..

Homework: 
Scan the "Hurricane of '38" page on TeacherWeb.com
Identify one relevant fact that will help you learn more about this informational text.



1-choice-is-ours.jpg    Week of September 9, 10, 11, 12, 13: Class notes






adoor_2.jpg Thursday, September 5


Introduction: 
1. Students received the following:
  • Schedule, locker/locker combination and planners 
  • 8th grade syllabus
  • Required parent signature forms (medical, photo release, technology contract, picture day...) Due Monday, September 9th.
2. 8th grade facts:
  • Even though we are housed in a middle school, 8th grade is the first year of high school according to the Common wealth of Massachusetts
  • Massachusetts is not a state.  Massachusetts is a commonwealth.
  • Each student will "figure out" the gifts he.she was given at birth, his.her learning style, what it means to be an independent, self-directed learner, and strategies for self-advocation.





3. Class Materials: due Monday, September 9th
  • Student choice College ruled notebook/journal
  • 1 (preferably 2) 2-pocket folders
  • 3 pens
  • 3 pencils and a hand-held pencil sharpener
  • 3 highlights (3 different colors)
  • glue sticks
  • 1 box of tissue given to homeroom teacher
 pic-keepajournal.JPG  







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