TeacherWeb

Cunniff Kids News

Email
 
This just in...
Special report: Steampunk festival in Waltham
The World Around Us
Special report: Battle of Lexington and Concord
An eye for news: Battle of Lexington and Concord
An Eye for News: Art Show
Front Page News
Favorite Things
Pleased to meet you
Fun and games
Halloween at the Cunniff
Special report: Clown debates
King Richard's Faire 2012
An eye for news: Ringling Bros. Circus
An eye for news: King Richard's Faire
Cunniff Culture
Read all about it!
Corridors and classrooms
Chicks!
An eye for news: Baby chicks 2010
An eye for news: Baby chicks 2009
Editorials
To the Cove and beyond!
An interview with ...
Pleased to meet you: Debby Ryan
Pleased to meet you: Henry Winkler
2011 Gift Guide
Fun features!
An eye for news: Fifth-grade play 2011
Special report: Meet the Candidates
Special report: Snowstorm!
Special report: New police station, 2008-2010
An eye for news: Fifth-grade play
Archive: Pleased to meet you
May I ask a few questions? Angela Hucles
May I ask a few questions? Harry and the Potters/Math the Band
Archive: To the Cove and beyond!
May I ask a few questions? Mike Reiss
An eye for news: Shubert Theatre
An eye for news: Magic class
An eye for news: Bonaparte
An eye for news: Scott Wahle
Archive: Front page news
Archive: The world around us
Archive: Corridors and classrooms
Archive: Cunniff culture
Archive: Fun and games
Closer look: Super Bowl
About the Cunniff Kids News



Top Divider

 

The World Around Us


*Interesting people, places, and stories* 

 
comicstop.jpg
Reporters from the Cunniff Kids News meet with Dave Philbrick (second from left), owner of  The Comic Stop, among the racks of his Watertown store. 
 

Super, in many ways 

The Comic Stop prepares for Free Comic Book Day 

 

     

By CHARLOTTE V., PATRICK W., KATHERINE L.,
ISABELLA V., and MAIREAD W.

Cunniff Kids News staff reporters
(Reprinted from April 25, 2009)

 

     Except for the ceiling and floor, every square inch is covered with comics. Candy, trading cards, and action figures are on display.
     Welcome to The Comic Stop.
     The store, which opened in 1996, is located on Main Street across from the Watertown Public Library. It is owned and run by Dave Philbrick, who has lived in Watertown for 20 years.
     Philbrick was an English major in college and a teacher at Martin Luther King School in Cambridge, but he wanted to run his own business.
     “I like my job,” he said. “I think working for yourself can be fun.’’
     The Comic Stop is open every day except Sunday,usually from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Philbrick works there every day, but his one employee, Jeremy, works on Saturday.
      “I think you have to be motivated because there’s no boss to tell you what to do,’’ Philbrick said.
      The books come in two formats, single comics and collections, called graphic novels. X-Men, Spider-Man, Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman are the most popular titles.
      Philbrick organizes the books on the shelves that line the wall by smaller companies, then DC and Marvel, the two biggest publishers of comics.

      He gets new comics on Wednesdays and puts them on specific shelves, then moves older comics to other shelves. He keeps up to six months’ worth of a comic, and he sells some of the more expensive ones on eBay.

      In the back room, some older comics are displayed in glass cases. The comics are from the 1960s and ‘70s, when comics sold for 12 cents. Now, he says, the average comic sells for $3 or $4.

     But on the first Saturday of May, comic books will cost zero dollars.bongo.jpg

     Free Comic Book Day, which started in 2001, is a day when comic book stores across the nation give away comics. This year, Free Comic Book Day is May 2. [In 2012, it will be held Saturday, May 5.]
     The particulars vary from store to store, but The Comic Stop will have food, a sketch artist, and “Star Wars” characters. The Comic Stop has a limit of five free comics for each person.

     Free Comic Book Day is usually tied to a movie that is coming out, and this year’s movie is “X-Men Origins: Wolverine.”

     “In the past, people have dressed up as comic book characters,” Philbrick said. “Feel free to dress up.”

     The Comic Stop also sells trading cards, including Yu-Gi-Oh!, Pokemon, and Magic. Pokemon is the best-seller, but one Friday a month Philbrick runs a Magic tournament where he serves pizza.

     Kids, parents, and teens go to The Comic Stop.

     “Every Wednesday, a lot of the same customers come in,’’ said Philbrick. “A lot of customers are in their 30s, 40s, and 50s. They’re old -- like me.”

     Surprisingly, Philbrick doesn’t read most of the comics he sells.

     “I still enjoy them, but I don’t read as many as I used to,” Philbrick said. “I tend to collect them more than I read.”

     (The Comic Stop is located at 134A Main St., Watertown, Mass. For more information, go to http://thecomicstop.com/. For more information about Free Comic Book Day, go to http://www.freecomicbookday.com/index.asp.)
 
-- Reprinted from April 25, 2009--

 





ckn-sargent-camp2.JPG
Cunniff students (from left) Luke, Julia, Catherine, and Shannon pose with reporters from the Cunniff Kids News
after finishing an interview about their recent trip to Sargent Center in Peterborough, N.H.

 Fifth-graders blaze new trail to Sargent Center


By CAILEIGH S., ANNABELLA B., and YASSMINE B.

Cunniff Kids News staff reporters

     “We knew it would be a fun experience because our brothers and sisters did it,” said Luke.

     Luke is a fifth-grade at Cunniff Elementary School in Watertown. He was talking about his recent three-day trip to Sargent Center in Peterborough, N.H., with some other fifth-graders. 

     About 15 kids from the Cunniff went this year, but it was not a school trip. Cunniff fifth-graders used to go every year, but then the camp closed.

     The center was run by Boston University since 1912. It is now run by Nature’s Classrooms. According to its website, Sargent Center has “700 acres of forest, pond, and stream to explore as a living laboratory to explore.”

     Since the center is open again, some Cunniff parents decided to organize a trip. They went from May 30-June 1.

     The first thing Luke, Shannon, Catherine, and Julia said they did was unpack, then they went to play Alaskan baseball and Pigeon.

     They said their favorite activities were the ropes course and the zipline.

     At one point, the Cunniff students were split into two groups. One group went for a walk on a woodsy path and caught frogs. (Some kids licked a slug!) The other group stayed by a lake.


     (For information about Sargent Center, go to http://www.naturesclassroom.org/sargent/.)


ckn-sargent-camp1.JPG
Reporters from the Cunniff Kids News conduct a television interview for "Watertown Weekly News" on Watertown Community Access Television. 


--June 13, 2012--

Hello Kitty and Happy Birthday

By ANDREA P.

Cunniff Kids News staff reporter

     I turned 9 years old. We went to BJ’s to get a Hello Kitty cake. We went to Chuck E. Cheese and we put the Hello Kitty cake on the table. They had Chuck E. Cheese plates and Chuck E. Cheese juice boxes.

     People sang “Happy Birthday” to me and we earned 1,000 tickets. We took a dollar and got a lot of tokens.
We played a rainbow tubes. We climbed down the tube and put our shoes on.

     I had an awesome birthday.


--May 25, 2012--




A kid and his (dad's) candy store

By NOAH H.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporter
My dad owns a candy store. The name of the store is Linden Superette. His store is in Boston. His store is open everyday, all day.
At the store, there is a lot of candy: chocolate bars, Kit Kats, gummy bears, and gummy sharks. My favorite candy is chocolate bars.
I love candy, and I love that my dad has a candy store.
Sometimes I even help him at the store.

--May 23, 2012--


A lot of surprises in store
for this new pet owner


By KHALED B. (with YASSMINE B.)

Cunniff Kids News staff reporters

     On April 23, I got a bird. He is a parrot.

     My sister suggested that we should name him Dr. Peanut, so we did. We named him Dr. Peanut because of his love for peanuts.

    We bought him lots of toys at PetSmart. When we came back, he was climbing the cage with his legs and beak. We were shocked!

     Dr. Peanut is not too big and not too small, but he does bite!  My sister put her hand in the cage to give him clean water and food.

     Dr. Peanut is gray on the outside and yellow and blue under his wings. He can sometimes talk. He can say, “What the.”

     We keep Dr. Peanut in the kitchen. We don’t have any other pets because they would hurt him. But we have a neighbor downstairs that has a cat, so we make sure he doesn’t come upstairs.


--May 17, 2012--



 
comicstop.jpg
Reporters from the Cunniff Kids News meet with Dave Philbrick (second from left), owner of  The Comic Stop, among the racks of his Watertown store. 
 

Super, in many ways 

The Comic Stop prepares for Free Comic Book Day 

 

     

By CHARLOTTE V., PATRICK W., KATHERINE L.,
ISABELLA V., and MAIREAD W.

Cunniff Kids News staff reporters
(Reprinted from April 25, 2009)

 

     Except for the ceiling and floor, every square inch is covered with comics. Candy, trading cards, and action figures are on display.
     Welcome to The Comic Stop.
     The store, which opened in 1996, is located on Main Street across from the Watertown Public Library. It is owned and run by Dave Philbrick, who has lived in Watertown for 20 years.
     Philbrick was an English major in college and a teacher at Martin Luther King School in Cambridge, but he wanted to run his own business.
     “I like my job,” he said. “I think working for yourself can be fun.’’
     The Comic Stop is open every day except Sunday,usually from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Philbrick works there every day, but his one employee, Jeremy, works on Saturday.
      “I think you have to be motivated because there’s no boss to tell you what to do,’’ Philbrick said.
      The books come in two formats, single comics and collections, called graphic novels. X-Men, Spider-Man, Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman are the most popular titles.
      Philbrick organizes the books on the shelves that line the wall by smaller companies, then DC and Marvel, the two biggest publishers of comics.

      He gets new comics on Wednesdays and puts them on specific shelves, then moves older comics to other shelves. He keeps up to six months’ worth of a comic, and he sells some of the more expensive ones on eBay.

      In the back room, some older comics are displayed in glass cases. The comics are from the 1960s and ‘70s, when comics sold for 12 cents. Now, he says, the average comic sells for $3 or $4.

     But on the first Saturday of May, comic books will cost zero dollars.bongo.jpg

     Free Comic Book Day, which started in 2001, is a day when comic book stores across the nation give away comics. This year, Free Comic Book Day is May 2. [In 2012, it will be held Saturday, May 5.]
     The particulars vary from store to store, but The Comic Stop will have food, a sketch artist, and “Star Wars” characters. The Comic Stop has a limit of five free comics for each person.

     Free Comic Book Day is usually tied to a movie that is coming out, and this year’s movie is “X-Men Origins: Wolverine.”

     “In the past, people have dressed up as comic book characters,” Philbrick said. “Feel free to dress up.”

     The Comic Stop also sells trading cards, including Yu-Gi-Oh!, Pokemon, and Magic. Pokemon is the best-seller, but one Friday a month Philbrick runs a Magic tournament where he serves pizza.

     Kids, parents, and teens go to The Comic Stop.

     “Every Wednesday, a lot of the same customers come in,’’ said Philbrick. “A lot of customers are in their 30s, 40s, and 50s. They’re old -- like me.”

     Surprisingly, Philbrick doesn’t read most of the comics he sells.

     “I still enjoy them, but I don’t read as many as I used to,” Philbrick said. “I tend to collect them more than I read.”

     (The Comic Stop is located at 134A Main St., Watertown, Mass. For more information, go to http://thecomicstop.com/. For more information about Free Comic Book Day, go to http://www.freecomicbookday.com/index.asp.)
 
-- Reprinted from April 25, 2009--

 



A vacation day with

Grandma and Grandpa

By ISABEL M.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporter
    Over April vacation, my Grandma and Grandpa came over. We did many fun things together.
    One fun thing that I did with my Grandpa was go to the playground and play. I got to play at both of the playgrounds at Victory Field, which was very fun.
    After we played at the playground, we went over to the tennis courts and watched the tennis team play.
    After we watched the tennis team play, I ran across the whole entire field. I was so tired after running across the field that my Grandpa and I decided to go home.
    I had a really fun day with my Grandpa.

--April 26, 2012--


A brother's birthday

By ISAAC
Cunniff Kids News staff reporter
    Over April vacation, I celebrated my brother’s birthday.
    We had his party on Saturday. There were about 40 people at the party.
    To eat, we ate candy, like Sweet Tarts, gluten-free “Star Wars” cake, party ice cream, and there were fruit punch juices and water to drink. (My favorite is fruit punch.)
    We had a pinata shaped like a dragon. Inside there was a lot of good candy.
    We had a game set up. The game was with water guns and we tried to get each other with them. We also played a wall game where you tried to get the clips on the X. We used a map in this game.
    We were playing outside with a few people at the end of the party.
    My favorite present that my brother got was a samurai  warrior.
    At the end of the party, everybody went home.

--April 26, 2012--


 




butter2.jpg

 

Flights of fancy colors

The Butterfly Place in Westford nets happy visitors


By ANNALEA M.

Cunniff Kids News staff reporter  butter9.jpg

     On April 6, 2012, I went to The Butterfly Place in Westford, Mass. There are lots of butterflies and they are different in colors and sizes. They can land on the butterfly charts that you are given at the front desk.

    At The Butterfly Place, there is a big butterfly room with all types of butterflies and plants. You can not touch the butterflies because one time someone swung at a butterfly and damaged its left wing.

     Some butterflies that I saw was an Owl butterfly that was brown on the outside with spots that sort of look like eyes and in the inside is the most vibrant blue.

     There is also a Great Eggfly, which is black with purple spots, and a Malachite, which is light black with green spots.

     There is not just butterflies, but there is also a little pond with Koi fish in it, baby quails, and a finch, which is a white bird with a stubbed orange beak.

     Also, there is a little gated area with a plate with banana peels for the butterflies to eat.

     There is also an exhibit room with big and small glass cases with either butterfly or moth stuff in if, and, last but not least, a gift shop.

     It is very fun there and I hope to go back to see the butterflies again!


     (For information on The Butterfly Place, go to https://butterflyplace-ma.com/.)




butter3.jpg




butter1.jpg



butter5.jpg



butter6.jpg



butter8.jpg



--April 18, 2012--



 

Hawks, eyed
Rustle and Lina at home on Purvis Street

By ELLA P., ANAIS M., and OLIVIA D.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporters
    Cats stay inside. Dogs you’re OK, except for little chihuahuas. There are two new residents on Purvis Street, Rustle and Lina, the red-tailed hawks.
    They have been spotted on the top of Purvis Street. Rustle is known for dominating his space. Lina is known for stealing other hawks’ food.
    Rustle was enjoying a mouse that he caught when Lina swooped down and tried to steal the mouse. As Rustle nipped at her claws, Lina had to flap her wings rapidly so she wouldn’t fall off, but she almost did.
    Rustle is very tame. No matter what goes by, Rustle stays there. Rustle is a sleek hawk with brown and white feathers and is speckled on his tummy.
    As Rustle looks up, he notices that rain is coming soon. Rustle is cleaning himself, then he looks around. Lina flies into a tree.
    Rustle looks around and his head almost goes all the way around. A couple of sparrows chase Lina out of the tree that she was perched in.
    Rustle ruffles his feathers. He notices that rain is coming, so he stands up and flies away, back to his cozy home.

--Dec. 23, 2011--



ckn-thanks-11.JPG
The staff of the Cunniff Kids News returns to work in the newsroom after the Thanksgiving vacation.


Stuffed with fun!

Cunniff students spent Thanksgiving with

family and friends all over the country

-- but not everybody ate turkey 


     Yummy turkey!

     That’s what many Cunniff School students ate on Thanksgiving, but not everyone.

     “I don’t like turkey,” Dylan said.

     Dylan went to his dad’s friend house. He and the other kids had macaroni and cheese, cornbread, and strawberries. The adults had turkey.

     Noah went to a friend’s house in Boston -- with 65 people! They had turkey, roast beef, spaghetti, chicken, stuffing, and gravy. After dinner, they played pool and bowling, and watched “Spy Kids 3” in 3-D.

     Christine went to her grandma’s house and Camille stayed home with her family and her dog, Boomer. Christine has turkey, corn, mashed potatoes, baked beans, rice, and fried chicken. Camille had deviled eggs, turkey, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, and pecan pie.

     Anna M. said her cousin, grandma, and grandpa came to her house. They ate turkey and pumpkin pie, and then they played games.

     “I had fun,” she said,

     Zach went to his grandma’s house and then to a restaurant for lunch. Michael M. went to his grandparents’ house. Nico ate with two cousins. Arushi ate turkey with three cousins. Chipego went to a friend’s house.

     Michael C. wet to his uncle’s house. He ate turkey and rolls, and then he went to his grandparents’ house. He ate cupcakes and then read books.

     Jacob and Charlotte went to their grandmother’s house for Thanksgiving dinner. They ate turkey, mashed potatoes, squash, peas, carrots, and stuffing.

     Anais went to Pennsylvania and ate turkey, cranberry sauce, and pie with her mom and dad, aunts, uncles, cousins, and grandma. 

     Anna V. went to her neighbor’s house with her sister, cousins, and grandma. Diego has turkey at a friend’s house in Rhode Island. Ben went to his cousins in New York City. He ate turkey, biscuits, bananas, and pumpkin pie. Natty went to New York, too, and Sophie went to her friend's house and slept over.

     Ella stayed home and her aunt, uncles, and grandparents came to her house and ate turkey, stuffing, Brussels sprouts, cake, pie, and ice cream.

     Andrea said she ate turkey, corn, and little hot dogs.

     “I love to eat turkey,” she said.

     Tim and TJ went to their friend Zeke’s house for Thanksgiving. When they got there, Zeke played Madden ’08 on the Wii and TJ played football inside the house. While TJ was playing, he hit his head on the corner of the couch and had to put an ice pack on it.

     Zeke’s dad said, “If you want to play football, you have to play it on the trampoline.”

     So they went outside, but there were only three people allowed at a time on the trampoline. Then everyone went inside and played Madden ’08, and then everyone had dinner. After dinner, they played Madden ’08 until they went home.


     (Story reported and written by Cunniff Kids News staff reporters Sophie B., Michael C., Charlotte D., Jacob D., Dylan D., Emma Ga., Emma Gr., Sophia G., Adam H., Noah H., Arushi I., Natemwa K., Bandna K., Benjamin K., Michael M., Anais M., Anna M., Niko M., Isabel M., Hailey N., Chipego N., Nina P., Zachary P., Andrea P., Camille P., Timmy P., TJ P., Diego P., Leticia S., and Anna V.) 


--Nov. 29, 2011--



 

ckn-mckee.jpg
Boston Globe reporter Megan McKee (left) seems to have a friendly rivalry with reporters from
the Cunniff Kids News, her competition for stories about Watertown.

Reporting on the reporter
The Globe's Megan McKee quite a story herself

By BANDNA K. and ARIANNA P.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporters

    Megan McKee is a news reporter at the Boston Globe, and one of the towns that she covers is Watertown. She has been working in journalism for six years. 
    Megan said the favorite part of her job is talking to people and learning new things every day. She said the least favorite part of her job is writing about things that are boring.
    A lot of her boring or exciting stories are on the Watertown page of Boston.com (http://www.boston.com/yourtown/watertown/).
    In the past few weeks Megan’s favorite article was about Natick High School getting MacBooks. Her favorite story of all time was writing about a shop keeper in Waltham.
    She has been working for the Boston Globe for 2.5 years, and she said her favorite person to work with is her editor Tom Coakley.
    She went to college at Northeastern. In high school, she said she worked at Papa Gino’s, Star Market, and as an exterminator.

--May 9, 2011--

 

Bright things this weekend at
Cambridge Science Festival

Free Science Carnival on Saturday, May 7,
with the Charles River to be lit up that night

By ASAD S. and SAM C.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporters

     The Cambridge Science Festival started April 30 and will end Sunday, May 8.
     On Saturday, May 7, there will be a free Science Carnival from noon to 4 p.m. at the Cambridge Public Library at 449 Broadway. There will be a lot of people there.
     A few cool things there, according to the online program guide, will be:
     * The Science of Taste & Paint -- In this activity, participants learn how genetic information is handed down through generations. 
     * WorldWide Telescope Ambassadors Program -- Take a guided tour of the Universe using the WorldWide Telescope, an interactive and stunningly beautiful virtual observatory that you can download at home for free on your own computer. 
     * Ocean FEST! -- Interested in exploring oceanography? Join us for Ocean FEST (Families Exploring Science Together) and participate in activities that put ocean science in the hands of students and their families! 
     * Microscopic Forensics and Microbes -- When there is an investigation at the scene of a crime, the smallest pieces of evidence are very important. Under a microscope, surprising details come to light to help solve a crime.
     * There's Gold in that Cell Phone! -- Ever wonder what metals are in your cell phone and where they come from? Come take a phone apart, find out where the metals inside are mined, and discover the best way to get rid of electronics when you’re done with them. 

     Also for everyone, on Saturday night, May 7, from 7 to 10 p.m., the Charles River and MIT will be lit up with glowing lights for FAST Light.
     For information on all of the events, go to www.cambridgesciencefestival.org. 

--May 6, 2011--



Science, without
the laboratory

Fifth-graders explore MIT Museum, home
of upcoming Cambridge Science Festival

By EVA M. and EMARI S.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporters
    Do you like science? The MIT Museum and the Edgerton Center are full of science!
    Both fifth-grade classes from the Cunniff School in Watertown went to Cambridge to see them March 21 and March 22. Every single bus trip was rowdy -- especially the kids in the back!
    Inside the museum, it looked like the Museum of Science. There were bizarre things to see at the museum, such as holograms and machines that oiled themselves. They also had walking robots.
    The museum is different than the Museum of Science because it looks so small on the outside, but it’s huge on the inside.
    The MIT Museum is mostly for kids about 10 years old and up, because a kindergartner or a second-grader might not understand what it’s about.
    (Note: The MIT Museum is the host of the annual Cambridge Science Festival, April 8-May 30, and features activities and events for all ages. For information, go to  the MIT Museum’s list of event’s at http://web.mit.edu/museum/programs/festival.html or the Cambridge Science Festival home page at http://cambridgesciencefestival.org/Home.aspx.)

    (For information about visiting the MIT Museum, go to http://web.mit.edu/museum/. For information on visiting the Edgerton Center, go to http://web.mit.edu/edgerton/main.html.)

--April 23, 2011--




You can help the Charles
get a spring cleaning

All are invited to annual cleanup
of river on Saturday, April 16 

By ISABELLA V.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporter

     When 3,000 people get together, they can make great progress.
     On Saturday, April 16, people from Watertown and all over Massachusetts can help protect the Charles River. The 12th annual Earth Day Charles River Cleanup will be held from 9 a.m.-noon at different sections of the river.
     Volunteers will pick up trash and recyclable things, remove branches, and sweep. The cleanup will happen along the Charles for 80 miles, all the way to Milford.
     “For the past 11 years, elected officials and members of the public have gathered every April to reverse the years of neglect and damage that the Charles and the land that surrounds it sustained, and to celebrate the transformation of this once dead river,” State Senator Steven Tolman told the Cunniff Kids News. “While we have made tremendous progress over the past decade, our commitment to the cleanup must continue to ensure that the river remains safe and clean for years to come.”
     If you want to help clean the river Saturday, you need to check in first. There are three nearby places for people to go before they start: the Dealtry Pool at 114 Pleasant St., near Watertown Square; the Brighton-Allston Swimming Pool, near the new Community Boating building; and Artesani Playground (and spray park) and Herter Park at 1255 Soldiers Field Road.
     The event is organized by the Charles River Watershed Association and many other groups, including the Esplanade Association, Charles River Conservancy, State Senator Tolman’s office, Trustees of Reservations, and the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
     The event will be held rain or shine, unless the weather is extremely bad. The CRWA wants volunteers to bring their own drinking water in refillable water bottles. They will have some gloves, rakes, and brooms for people to use, but you can bring your own, too.
     After the cleanup, the volunteers are invited to go to Artesani Playground for refreshments from noon to 1 p.m.
     (For information, go to http://www.crwa.org/.)

--April 13, 2011--

 

Come meet the candidates!

Watertown school newspapers to 
sponsor
March 29 event 
for 10th Middlesex election  

By SOPHIE B., BRIANNA S., HAILEY D., MICHAEL M., and MEAGAN K
Cunniff Kids News staff reporters

     The Watertown school newspapers are holding a meet-the-candidates night for the State Representative race at Watertown Middle School on March 29 from 6-7:30 p.m.
     The event is free and open to everyone. Snacks and drinks will be available.
     The candidates are running to become the State Representative for the 10th Middlesex District. The special election is being held because Peter Koutoujian left to become Middlesex County sheriff.
     All  five candidates are invited to come. The candidates are Allan “Jay” Ciccone, Jim Dixon, Sean Durkee, John Lawn, and Gary Marchese. The primary is April 12 and the special election is May 10.
     The meet-the candidates night is being sponsored by the three newspapers in the Watertown Public Schools: Cunniff Kids News (Cunniff Elementary), Watertown Splash (Watertown Middle School), and Raider Times (Watertown High School).
     “I wanted everyone to be able to meet and talk with as many candidates as possible at one time,” said John Vitti, the parent volunteer who helps run the Cunniff Kids News and the Watertown Splash. 
     According to Mr. Vitti, here is the schedule for the meet-the-candidates event: 6 p.m., informal meet and greet; 6:30 p.m., questions from student newspaper reporters to the candidates on stage; 7 p.m., informal meet and greet.

--March 9, 2011--




ckn-bee-1.jpg
Sit a spell
and tell us

Students explain what it felt like
to compete in first Spelling Bee

By the Cunniff Kids News staffckn-bee-2.jpg
     Kids buzzed into the Watertown Middle School auditorium on Feb. 13 for the first townwide Spelling Bee. 
     More than 150 amazing spellers -- 31 from the Cunniff -- from second to fifth grade spelled complicated words. There were nine “Hives”. In every Hive were five or six teams of three Watertown students. 
     In every Hive, there was a tricky word. “Extraterrestrial” stumped the fourth-graders, while third-graders said they found “government” and “opportunity” to be challenging. 
     Here’s some advice: When it is your turn, you should spell the word clearly and give pauses between each letter in the word. ckn-bee-10.jpg
     Lauren, a Cunniff third-grader, said, “I felt scared because I felt like I was going to lose.” 
     Luckily, everyone had chances at spelling two words, so students had a good chance of doing well. 
     Brianna, Lauren, and Ashley made up the Queen Bees, and they came in second in Hive 6.
     All participants received a bag of gummy letters.
     “The gummies were good, but we still felt sad [after not winning],” said Brianna.
     The Spell Busters were the only Cunniff team to win a hive. The team was made up of Maggie Wensink, Asad Soomro, and Sana Soomro. They won Hive 7.
     Sana said she “felt astonished because it was my first time [in a spelling contest].”
     The kids on a team that won a round got trophies. The trophy was gray and had a bee on it.ckn-bee-12.jpg
     Cunniff students said one of the coolest things was being on teams with Hosmer and Lowell students. 
     The teachers who announced the words were Caitlin Rooney, Amy Donohue, Patty  McCarthy, and Ms. W (Zaida Wincelowicz). Ms. Rono made an appearance for moral support. 

     Here’s a list of the winning Hives:
     Hive 1 (Grade 5): Word Wizards -- Claire Gabel (Hosmer), Spencer McClellan (Hosmer), and Janaki Thangaraj (Hosmer).
     Hive 2 (Grade 5):  The Queen Bees -- Melanie Alberico (Lowell),  Christina Borelli (Lowell), and Ruby Cohen (Lowell).
     Hive 3 (Grade 4): The Queen Bees -- Shannon Dunn (Hosmer), MaryKate Griffin (Hosmer), and Niki Hamidi (Hosmer).ckn-bee-3.jpg
     Hive 4 (Grade  4): The Stinging Celtics -- Nicholas McDermott (Lowell), 
Jeremy Ornstein (Lowell), and Joe Walter (Lowell).
     Hive 5 (Grade 3): TIE
     Spelling Specialists -- Brittany Catsoulis (Hosmer), Anna Papayannopoulos (Hosmer), and Lakshmi Thangaraj (Hosmer).
     The Spellmonsters -- Lila Cherry-German (Hosmer), Yeraz Kaligian (Hosmer), and Ian Simpson (Hosmer).
     Hive 6 (Grade 3): Team Superstars (Grade 3) -- Susan Howard (Lowell), Hannah McDonald (Lowell), and Rachael Stokes (Lowell).
     Hive 7 (Grade 2): Spell Busters -- Asad Soomro (Cunniff), Sana Soomro (Cunniff), and Maggie Wensink (Cunniff).ckn-bee-4.jpg
     Hive 8 (Grade 2): TIE
     The Skulls -- Ameer Alhady (Lowell), Chris Diaz (Lowell), and Ahmed Khan (Lowell).
     Super Speller Girls --  Nicole Delgado (Lowell), Sana Rafia (Lowell), and Sara Spiers (Lowell).
     Hive 9 (Grade 2): The Cupcake Cuties -- Jocelyn Beecher (Hosmer), Julia Beecher (Hosmer), and Jenna Petrie (Hosmer).

ckn-bee-awards.jpg


--Feb. 16, 2011--



ckn-queen-bees.jpg
The Queens Bees, a team of Cunniff School third-graders, competed in Hive 6 at the first Watertown Spelling Bee Feb. 13. 

The town is buzzing!
Students swarm to first Watertown Spelling Bee 

     Below is a complete list of winners from the 2011 Spelling Bee. The event, staged by the Watertown Education Foundation, was held Sunday, Feb. 13, at Watertown Middle School, and featured more than 150 Watertown students in grades 2 to 5. The students made up more than 50 teams that were divided into nine grade-level competitive groups, or Hives.
     Check back with the Cunniff Kids News this week for a story -- and photos -- about an event that has the whole town buzzing!

Winning Hives
     Hive 1 (Grade 5): Word Wizards -- Claire Gabel (Hosmer), Spencer McClellan (Hosmer), and Janaki Thangaraj (Hosmer).
     Hive 2 (Grade 5):  The Queen Bees -- Melanie Alberico (Lowell),  Christina Borelli (Lowell), and Ruby Cohen (Lowell).
     Hive 3 (Grade 4): The Queen Bees -- Shannon Dunn (Hosmer), MaryKate Griffin (Hosmer), and Niki Hamidi (Hosmer).
     Hive 4 (Grade  4): The Stinging Celtics -- Nicholas McDermott (Lowell), 
Jeremy Ornstein (Lowell), and Joe Walter (Lowell).
     Hive 5 (Grade 3): TIE
     Spelling Specialists -- Brittany Catsoulis (Hosmer), Anna Papayannopoulos (Hosmer), and Lakshmi Thangaraj (Hosmer).
     The Spellmonsters -- Lila Cherry-German (Hosmer), Yeraz Kaligian (Hosmer), and Ian Simpson (Hosmer).
     Hive 6 (Grade 3): Team Superstars (Grade 3) -- Susan Howard (Lowell), Hannah McDonald (Lowell), and Rachael Stokes (Lowell).
     Hive 7 (Grade 2): Spell Busters -- Asad Soomro (Cunniff), Sana Soomro (Cunniff), and Maggie Wensink (Cunniff).
     Hive 8 (Grade 2): TIE
     The Skulls -- Ameer Alhady (Lowell), Chris Diaz (Lowell), and Ahmed Khan (Lowell).
     Super Speller Girls --  Nicole Delgado (Lowell), Sana Rafia (Lowell), and Sara Spiers (Lowell).
     Hive 9 (Grade 2): The Cupcake Cuties -- Jocelyn Beecher (Hosmer), Julia Beecher (Hosmer), and Jenna Petrie (Hosmer).

--Feb. 14, 2011--
 

Spelling-Bee.JPG
Amy Donohue (left), organizer of the first Watertown Spelling Bee, poses with Cunniff Kids News reporters on Jan. 11. 

Letter rip!

First townwide Spelling Bee to be held Feb. 13
for Watertown students in Grades 2 through 5


By AKRAM B., EVA M., and RYAN L.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporters
     Buzz, buzz, buzz, the Spelling Bee is coming to Watertown on Feb. 13.
     The Bee is available to Lowell, Cunniff, and Hosmer elementary school students from second to fifth grade. 
     The Bee will be Sunday, Feb. 13, at Watertown Middle School at 12:30 p.m.
     Amy Donohue is organizing the Spelling Bee. She said to participate, you need a group of three people in the same grade, and the group gets to pick its name. The students in the teams will work together to spell the words.  
     She said the Spelling Bee is for fun. “But we are trying to bring some healthy competition to the Spelling Bee,” she said.
     Donohue said that registration for the Bee closes Fri., Jan. 21.
     Each student has to pay $20 to enter ($60 for each group). The money goes to the Watertown Education Foundation Grant Program. The program gives local schools supplies they ask for.
     There is also a raffle. Tickets are $10 and five for $25. The grand prize is an iPad, but there also some smaller prizes.  
     There are Spelling Bee T-shirts for sale for $5. They will also be on sale the day of the Bee. The logo for the shirt was designed by Katherine Lawn of the Cunniff School.
     To prepare for the Spelling Bee, the Watertown Education Foundation is showing “Akeelah and the Bee” at the Watertown Public Library on Tuesday, Jan. 18, at 1:30 p.m. The movie is free and people can bring snacks and drinks.
     “The movie was chosen because it is really motivating,” Donohue said.

     (For information on the Watertown Spelling Bee, contact Amy Donohue at ahowie@verizon.net. Registration closes Friday, Jan. 21.)

--Jan. 18, 2011--
 

Flush with knowledge
Fourth-grade classes learn about water from MWRA

By JAROD D., BRENDAN G., and PETER A.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporters
    On Oct. 27,  Meg Tabacsko came to Ms. Rabbitt’s and Mrs. DiIeso’s classes to tell the students about the MWRA and what it does.
    The MWRA stands for Massachusetts Water Resource Authority. She told us what happens to the water that gets flushed down the drain. It travels through pipes to Deer Island, where they clean it.
    We also learned that sludge sinks and scum rises.
    Some of the things the workers find at Deer Island are  money, jewelery, diapers, soda cans, leaves, dead animals, and cell phones.
    One interesting story she told was how someone who worked for the MWRA found a $50 bill in one of the tanks. He picked it up and went to a store to buy something … and the cashier put the bill in his mouth!
    So never put money in your mouth because you never know were it has been.
    If you want to know more about Deer Island and the MWRA, you should go to their webpage (http://www.mwra.state.ma.us/02org/html/sti.htm) or talk to Meg Tabacsko.
--Jan. 2, 2011--


schoolofrock.JPG
Bill Galatis (center), music director for Watertown's School of Rock, poses with Cunniff Kids News reporters Dec. 14.

For those about to rock
Watertown music school puts local students in the spotlight

By MICHAELA K.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporter
     If you want to go to the School of Rock in Watertown, you should learn more about Bill Galatis.
     He is the music director of the school.  At the School of Rock, kids as young as 7 can learn to play an instrument just like in a real rock band.
     Some of the instruments you can play are guitar, bass, vocals, keyboards, and drums. Students at the school put on live shows at real rock clubs around Boston.
     Bill runs the school with general manager Anderson Mar. They are both in rock bands, and so are a lot of the other instructors.
     Bill’s favorite instrument is the guitar and he likes teaching it. He was born on March 1. In addition to music, he likes unicorns, cheese, and pie!
     “This is my favorite job yet,” he said, happily.
     The School of Rock is at 120 Elm St. in Watertown, behind Target and across the street from Filippello Park.  
     The School of Rock is open five days a week, Tuesday to Saturday. If you are between the ages of 7 and 17, you can join.
     Also, this winter vacation, kids can go to the School of Rock for winter break camp for four days, Dec. 27-30.
     To sign up or for more information call, 617-923-3434, or go online at www.schoolofrock.com and click on the Boston school locator.

(Story reported by Cunniff Kids News staff reporters Akram B., Fatima B., Hailey D., Meagan K., Michaela K., Emari S., Brianna S., and Isabella V.)

--Dec. 22, 2010--


On the prowl

Third-graders have roaring good time at Franklin Park Zoo

By LAUREN A., YASSMINE B., SANA S., and CAILEIGH S.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporters
     The third-grade classes from the Cunniff School went to the Franklin Park Zoo in September.
      The bus smelled like gasoline and a bunch of kids were singing. When the third-graders finally pulled up to the zoo, everybody started yelling and saying, “We’re here!”
       When the students got out of the bus, everybody was excited to get inside -- but they were early so they had a five-minute snack instead, which was still fun.
       Finally, everybody got inside, and the first thing they saw were zebras and an ostrich. They also found out that zebras are brown, and they get black and white as they get older.
       When the third-graders walked past the gorilla exhibit, they learned that there was a gorilla that was going to have a baby. Her name was Kiki. The baby’s father was very protective of the mother and he smashed his fist against the glass because the students were making him nervous, but the guide said not to worry.
       When it was time to go home, everybody was sad because they had such a good time. Everybody was tired, so they fell asleep. When they got back to school, it was time to go home. The third-graders had so much fun that all of them want to go back.

--Nov. 9, 2010--


CKN-police-booking.JPG
Officer Lloyd Burke answers questions from Cunniff Kids News reporters
in the booking room of the new Watertown police station.


A badge of honor

New Watertown police station open for business;
grand opening celebration moved to Oct. 7


By ALEXIS C., TIMMY C., EMARI S., BRIANNA S., ISABELLA V., SHAY D.,
SHARIEL J., JAKE M., LAUREN A., RYAN L., CAILEIGH S., SAM C.,
DECLAN G., SHAMAELLE J., SEAN L., JACOB D., BRENDEN D.,
MICHAEL M.,  CHARLOTTE D., and MATTHEW M.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporters

     It has that new building smell.
     The new Watertown police station does not smell like criminals, handcuffs, gas, mud, or your house.
     The new Watertown police station is a clean, two-story building at 552 Main St., next to the Browne House. It replaces the old building in Watertown Square, near the library.
     The grand opening celebration was supposed to be Sept. 30, but it was moved to Oct. 7 at 5 p.m. because of the weather. But the building is already open and working.
          Inside the building is the lobby. There are glass display cases and one of them has a magnum pistol, flashlights, hats, and a knife. There is a wanted poster with a picture of a man whose nose is on the side of his face.
     Next to the lobby is the community training room. In it are chairs and a flat-screen TV. On Tuesday, Sept. 28, Chief Edward Deveau was preparing the room for a special occasion: A Watertown police lieutenant was retiring after 40 years and it was his last shift.
     Through a door is the dispatch room. The officers sit at computers and look at big video screens on the wall. They answer the calls from people in Watertown. 
     Through another door is the booking room. This is where the police take people when they are in custody. The Watertown police only keeps prisoners for a little while before moving them to another building. There is a small cell with a window. Officer Lloyd Burke said the cell is a place “for really drunk people” and the window is so the officers can watch and make sure the prisoners are all right.
     In the booking room is a place for prisoners to stand and have their picture taken. There are footprints on the floor for the person to stand on. The special camera focuses on the person’s eyes by itself, whether the person is tall or short or leaning to one side.  There is an expensive fingerprint machine that sends fingerprints to the FBI, and, in 10 minutes, the Watertown police can find out if the person is wanted anywhere else in the country.
    In the basement is the roll call room where the officers start each shift. On the wall is a bullet trap, which is used so officers can safely check that a gun is loaded.
    On the second floor are a lot of rooms and offices, including a break room and a juvenile watch room for kids, such as runaways.
     Throughout the building are red buttons that look like Easy buttons, but they are to be pushed only in case of emergency. Officer Burke said if a button is pushed, orange strobe lights would go off all around the building and police officers would stop what they were doing and come help. It is very tempting not to push the buttons.
     Two years ago at the site, there was rubble, construction material, and big holes in the ground.
     Now there are flowers next to the walkway to the building.  On top of the building is a big clock. The building was built on the site of the old Browne School. The granite “Browne School” sign was saved and now it is facing Main Street in the front wall of the new Watertown police station.

CKN-police-dispatch.JPG
The dispatch room at the new Watertown police station receives calls from people throughout town.

-- Sept. 29, 2010 --



     
Making a splash
Dunk tank always a highlight at Faire on the Square

By ALEXIS C., TIMMY C., HAILEY D., OWEN G.,

MEAGAN K., BETH P., and BRIANNA S.

Cunniff Kids News staff reporters

     Splish, splash, splish, splash!

     What’s that sound? It’s the sound of people getting dunked inside a freezing tank of water.

     The dunk tank is a fund-raiser for the Cunniff School’s fifth grade. It will be at Watertown’s Faire on the Square Saturday, Sept. 25, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

     Fifth-grade teacher Alicia Appugliese and Cunniff Kids News chief John Vitti and others have volunteered to get dunked.

     It costs $1 for one ball, $5 for six balls, and $10 for an automatic dunk.

     So come to the Faire in the Square and enjoy drinks and refreshments and stop by the fifth-grade’s dunk  tank!

--Sept. 24, 2010--





ckn-car-wash-9-18-10.JPG


A drop in the bucket
Cunniff 5th grade starts fund-raising with car wash


By FATIMA B., MICHAELA K., JIE SEN L., EVA M., EMARI S., and ISABELLA V.

Cunniff Kids News staff reporters    

     Soap suds and a whole lot of fun happened at the Cunniff School’s fifth-grade car wash.

     The car wash happened Saturday, Sept. 18, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and was the fifth grade’s first fund-raiser. Both fifth grade classes at the Cunniff washed more than 80 cars and raised $662. The money is going to the end-of-the-year events.

     Twenty-seven fifth-grade families signed up. Tim Eaton donated the hoses. Teachers, students, and friends of the Cunniff all participated. Younger siblings, too! 

     When the fifth-graders started washing, the new Cunniff principal, Cindy Crimmin, had her car washed.

     The bake sale was a big hit. Cookies, brownies, and cornbread were included. One of the best parts was near the end when Pini’s Pizza stopped by and everyone got pizza.

     That was one warm sunny day.


--Sept. 24, 2010--











Browne House adds color
to local history



By AYMEN B., SOPHIA G., MICHAEL M., EOIN M., and ZACHARY P. Cunniff Kids News staff reporters

 

     On April 27, 2010, the kindergartners and pre-kindergartners from the Cunniff School went to the Browne House in Watertown on a walking field trip. They walked there with kindergarten teachers Ms. DiDomenico, Ms. Tanguay, Mrs. Fitzpatrick, Mrs. Kimmins, Patty, and Kathy.

 

     This was the second field trip of the year for the kindergartners and pre-kindergartners. The first field trip was to the Science Museum, but Eoin M. liked the Browne House field trip better.

 

     “It was fun because I saw my house when we were leaving, and the wind was so strong,” said Eoin.

 

     Sophia G. agreed. “I liked it because I saw my sister’s school,” she said.

 

     The Browne House was built in the 1600s by Captain Abraham Browne. It is located at 562 Main St., next to the new police station.

 

     Abraham Browne was born Aug. 26, 1671. He was the town treasurer, a selectman, and a town clerk. Captain Browne died there Nov. 27, 1729.

 

     The Browne House is open for tours.  For more information, contact the Browne House at BrowneHouse@Historic.NewEngland.org.

 

 

--May 12, 2010--





 
comicstop.jpg
Reporters from the Cunniff Kids News meet with Dave Philbrick (second from left), owner of  The Comic Stop, among the racks of his Watertown store. 
 

Super, in many ways 

The Comic Stop prepares for Free Comic Book Day 

 

     

By CHARLOTTE V., PATRICK W., KATHERINE L.,
ISABELLA V., and MAIREAD W.

Cunniff Kids News staff reporters
(Reprinted from April 25, 2009)

 

     Except for the ceiling and floor, every square inch is covered with comics. Candy, trading cards, and action figures are on display.
     Welcome to The Comic Stop.
     The store, which opened in 1996, is located on Main Street across from the Watertown Public Library. It is owned and run by Dave Philbrick, who has lived in Watertown for 20 years.
     Philbrick was an English major in college and a teacher at Martin Luther King School in Cambridge, but he wanted to run his own business.FCBD_cymk_date1.jpg
     “I like my job,” he said. “I think working for yourself can be fun.’’
     The Comic Stop is open every day except Sunday,usually from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Philbrick works there every day, but his one employee, Jeremy, works on Saturday.
      “I think you have to be motivated because there’s no boss to tell you what to do,’’ Philbrick said.
      The books come in two formats, single comics and collections, called graphic novels. X-Men, Spider-Man, Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman are the most popular titles.
      Philbrick organizes the books on the shelves that line the wall by smaller companies, then DC and Marvel, the two biggest publishers of comics.

      He gets new comics on Wednesdays and puts them on specific shelves, then moves older comics to other shelves. He keeps up to six months’ worth of a comic, and he sells some of the more expensive ones on eBay.

      In the back room, some older comics are displayed in glass cases. The comics are from the 1960s and ‘70s, when comics sold for 12 cents. Now, he says, the average comic sells for $3 or $4.

     But on the first Saturday of May, comic books will cost zero dollars.bongo.jpg

     Free Comic Book Day, which started in 2001, is a day when comic book stores across the nation give away comics. This year, Free Comic Book Day is May 2. [In 2010, it will be held Saturday, May 1.]
     The particulars vary from store to store, but The Comic Stop will have food, a sketch artist, and “Star Wars” characters. The Comic Stop has a limit of five free comics for each person.

     Free Comic Book Day is usually tied to a movie that is coming out, and this year’s movie is “X-Men Origins: Wolverine.”

     “In the past, people have dressed up as comic book characters,” Philbrick said. “Feel free to dress up.”

     The Comic Stop also sells trading cards, including Yu-Gi-Oh!, Pokemon, and Magic. Pokemon is the best-seller, but one Friday a month Philbrick runs a Magic tournament where he serves pizza.

     Kids, parents, and teens go to The Comic Stop.

     “Every Wednesday, a lot of the same customers come in,’’ said Philbrick. “A lot of customers are in their 30s, 40s, and 50s. They’re old -- like me.”

     Surprisingly, Philbrick doesn’t read most of the comics he sells.

     “I still enjoy them, but I don’t read as many as I used to,” Philbrick said. “I tend to collect them more than I read.”

     (The Comic Stop is located at 134A Main St., Watertown, Mass. For more information, go to http://thecomicstop.com/. For more information about Free Comic Book Day 2010, Saturday, May 1,  go to http://www.freecomicbookday.com/index.asp.)
 
-- Reprinted from April 25, 2009--

 





CKN-plumbing.jpg
Reporters from the Cunniff Kids News and the Watertown Splash pose near one of the many exhibits at the Plumbing Museum.  

It's fun to drop by

Visitors can sink their teeth
into Watertown's Plumbing Museum


    
     You can say potty words at this place.
     Housed in an old ice house on Rosedale Road in Watertown, the Plumbing Museum is not your typical museum with dinosaur bones or fancy paintings. (Although it does have some interesting artwork.)
     When you first enter. you see what looks like a somewhat ordinary kitchen. The building was made around 1900 and all the bricks and beams are old. There used to be tracks near the museum and trains would bring blocks of ice from lakes in New Hampshire. As you continue walking, it only gets funnier and more interesting.
     Here you can find everything related to plumbing from pipes, tools, bathtubs, bathroom signs from all around the world -- some more appropriate than others -- and, of course, toilets!
     There are 25 toilets at the museum, but only two are usable. Some are antiques, and the the oldest one is from the 1800s. There are wooden toilets and porcelain toilets. One of the more modern toilets had tons of special features, including adjustable temperature, automatic opening, and a fresh scent. There is even old-fashioned toilet paper. Did you know that it came in a  package of small brown squares and not on a roll?
     There are also wooden pipes dating to the 1600s. These pipes stretched from Jamaica Pond to Faneuil Hall.  The pipe was underground and the water was used to fight fires and for personal use.
     The tools are modern and old, and include pipe cutters and one to thread pipes. You can touch some of the tools, pipes, and fittings. And there are books, such as "Flushed with Pride: The story of Thomas Crapper."
     If you are looking for an unusual museum to visit, go the Plumbing Museum and check out the toilets!
     (For information about the Plumbing Museum, go to http://theplumbingmuseum.org/.)
     
  
--March 11, 2010--



“The Sims”: Real-life fun

 

     

By ALEXIS C. and CHRISTINE S.

Cunniff Kids News staff reporters

     Have you ever heard of “The Sims”?

     “The Sims” is a very popular computer game created by EA and Sims fans. “The Sims” series has been around since 2000, which means “The Sims” started it all. Then “The Sims 2”  came next. Then “The Sims 3”.

     Your Sims personal life is up to you! Go out in the town, get a job, maybe a love life?

     Some of the neighborhoods in the games are Sunset Valley, Pleasant View, Strangetown, Veronaville, Arbor Falls, Blue Water Village, Champs le Sims, Magic Town, Al-Simhara, and Sang Simila.

     The careers a player can choose include Adventure, Gamer, Paranormal, Animal Care, and way more.

     It’s up to you! Ignore your Sims mother-in-law? Ha-ha! While you’re at it, get chased by a mummy in the Pyramids.

      (So now do you want to play “The Sims”?)

 

--Jan. 22, 2010--

    




 
gamewrightsleeping.jpg
The cards in Sleeping Queens took on different looks after it was created by 6-year-old Miranda Evarts.
 

Toying with an idea 

At Gamewright in Newton, people are
hard at work inventing and selling games 

     It was all fun and games in the Cunniff Kids newsroom.
     “I play games all day, from 9 to 5,’’ said Emily Nichols of Gamewright.
      She runs the Family Game Nights.  She will be bringing Gamewright games to a free Family Game Night Monday, Nov. 2 at the Watertown Middle School cafeteria from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
     Jason Schneider is in product development and marketing. Marketing is helping those toys and games sell.
     “I take an idea for a toy to a real toy,’’ he said.
 

The Cunniff Kids is hosting a free Family Game Night of Gamewright games
in the cafeteria of the Watertown Middle School
 on Monday, Nov. 2 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
For information, contact the Cunniff Kids News at cunniffnews@hotmail.com


    Gamewright is a company that designs and makes games and toys. It is part of a bigger company called Ceaco. Gamewright is 15 years old and it has an office at 70 Bridge St. in Newton. There are about 20 people at the office, but they don’t manufacture games there. There are manufacturing plants all over the world.
     The games Gamewright makes include Slamwich, Hats Off, and Sleeping Queens. There are about 100 Gamewright games. The most popular game is Slamwich. It came out 15 years ago and it has sold more than 1 million copies.
     Anyone can create games.  There is a game called Sleeping Queens that was created by Miranda Evarts, a 6-year-old girl from New Jersey. Her mother sent an e-mail to Gamewright and then sent rules and playing cards. Schneider took the cards and played it with groups of kids.
     “The kids and parents liked it a lot,’’ said Schneider.
     Miranda’s sister drew artwork. Gamewright almost kept her pictures for the game, but decided to use professional artists instead. It took about 10 months after the first e-mail for the game to come out.
     (Story continues below photos)
 gamewrightcat.jpg
gamewrightringo.jpg
    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
At left, Ringo Flamingo gets tested in the Cunniff Kids newsroom. At right, the first Cat Queen (bottom), the version almost used by Gamewright (center) that was drawn by the inventor's sister, and the final professionally done product (top).
 

     Gamewright makes 8 to 10 new games a year.  Another new game coming out is called Forbidden Island.
     A new game Cunniff Kids News reporters got to play is called Ringo Flamingo.  It has just arrived in stores that sell Gamewright games, such as Belmont Toy Store.  Ringo Flamingo is fun because you fling plastic life preservers onto flamingos.  You win if you get the flamingos, but you lose if you save the alligators.
    Ringo Flamingo was made by professional inventors. It was originally called Help and instead of flamingos, there were little people drowning.
     “The idea of people drowning didn’t sound fun,’’ said Schneider, “so we changed it to flamingos.’’
     (This story was reported and written by Cunniff Kids News staff reporters Dom M., Shannon M.,  Patrick W., Meagan K.,  Isabella V., Jalen M., Arianna P., Mairead W., Ryan L., Dyanne B., Sam C., Jacob D., Giovanni R., Julian R., and Eoin M.)
     (For information on Gamewright and its products, go to www.gamewright.com.)
 
gamewrightgroup.jpg
Jason Schneider (center, in blue) and Emily Nichols (center, in white) of Gamewright
pose with reporters from the Cunniff Kids News in their newsroom.

--Oct. 28, 2009--


 
policeoctober09prisoners.jpg
Cunniff Kids News reporters became the first people to test the jail cells at the new Watertown Police Station.
 
 
Almost open
for business 
Construction at new Watertown Police Station in final stages

     The new Watertown Police Station is almost finished.

     “This time last year it was just a hole in the ground,” said Officer Lloyd Burke.

     The construction is supposed to be finished on Dec. 29, 2009, but, according to Officer Burke, it may take until February 2010 before the police department can move in all of its stuff -- the furniture, files, computers, supplies, evidence, and recovered stolen property.
 

Cunniff Kids News video: Outsidethenewpolicestation.wmv
Click on link to see construction equipment at work

 
     The Browne School used to be where the new police station is being built. It was demolished in August 2008. Officer Burke said the new police station will cost $13 million to build.
     (Story continued below)


Before ...

maypolice3.jpgNewpolicestation11-12-08-10.jpg
The police station grows out of the ground in November 2008 (above);
the front entrance on the west side in May 2009 (right)


 

 
...and after
 
policeoctober09garage.jpg
policeoct09siding.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The garage area in the back of the building (left) and the west side of the project (right).


      The Watertown Police Department has a Haunted House every Halloween. Because the new station is not finished, the Haunted House will be at the old station in Watertown Square.
      Officer Burke said the Haunted House will be extra spooky this year, with scary music and Halloween decorations. In the jail cells will be actors dressed up in costumes. During the Haunted House, any real prisoners are sent to the police stations in Waltham or Belmont.
     “As far as I know, it is the only haunted police station around,” Officer Burke said.
 

Click on link to see CKN reporters enter the new police station for the first time.

 
     The new police station also has jails. There will be cells for men, women, and juveniles. They can not hold more than seven people at one time.
     They do not put bars on the doors or windows anymore because the prisoners can try to use the bars as weapons or get their heads stuck or use them to hurt themselves. Now they use thick Plexiglas for windows, and sliding steel doors.
     The cells are not finished yet. But they are cramped and dark and they only hold one prisoner each. There is no ceiling yet and you can see the pipes for the sprinkler. On the floor are holes with boards over them where the drains are going to be.
 

 Cunniff Kids News video: CunniffKidsNewsreporters...injail.wmv
Click on link to see Cunniff Kids News reporters examine the new jail cells.

 
     Inside the police station it is loud because workers are using demolition drills. Outside you can hear the beeping from the front-end loaders and trucks.

     Outside the side door where the prisoners will come in is a concrete cutter and a pipe bender. On the ground is reinforcing wire for the concrete to hold up the wall.

     “It’s kind of like your bones and tendons,” Officer Burke said.
     In the back, near the garage, there was supposed to be paving this week, but it was rained out. The ground is muddy and the drains and manholes stick out of the ground. The manholes are heavy. They weigh 300 pounds each. policeoct09dumper.jpg

     There are sticks in the ground with orange tape on them. They are called “stakes” and they mark on high the pavement is supposed to go.

     “You don’t want the pavement to be higher than the building, because then you’d have water in the building,” Officer Burke said.

     In the front of building, in the grass by the fence on Main Street, it is wet. There is an orange safety fence. There are pipes and parts of sewers on the ground. It smells like gasoline. The bulldozers were pushing dirt in the driveway. The muddy ground has lots of tire tracks and puddles.
     (Story reported and written by Cunniff Kids News staff reporters Dom M., Owen G., Renee S., Isabella V., Elizabeth A., Jalen M., Jake M., Arianna P., Ryan L., Dyanne B., Sam C., Giovanni R., Julian R., and Jacob D.)
     (For more information about the new police station, to see other pictures of the site, and to watch video taken during the demolition and construction process, go to http://www.watertownpd.org/new_station/cons_update.html.) 

policeoct09all.jpg
Officer Lloyd Burke (back row center) stands with reporters from the Cunniff Kids News at the Main Street
entrance of the new Watertown Police Station. 

--Oct. 7, 2009--
 
 

 

 

 
'Hoppy' to be there 
Frogs, chicks catch third-grade's eye at Museum of Science

 

      [Editor’s note: A number of Cunniff Kids News staff reporters recently accompanied the third-graders from the Cunniff School during their recent trip to Boston’s Museum of Science. The following stories were written by those reporters.]

 

***** 

 

     The exhibit called “Frogs’’ was on the third floor of the Museum of Science.  The room was humid, dark, and hot, like a rainforest because frogs are used to that climate.

     The exhibit showed frogs in two different stages of life and included about 12 tanks of frogs and one tadpole tank.

      There were many different species of frogs, including the leafy frog, tree frog, the American and African bullfrog, and the Goliath frog.  The leafy frog was about the size of a computer mouse, and it was the color of leaves (tan, brown) to camouflage it from enemies. The tree frog was bigger than the leafy frog, and was greenish-white in color. It had white stripes on its back, and bumps that oozed natural sunscreen to protect it from the sun.

     The American bullfrog and the African bullfrog were very similar looking, but the African bullfrog was much bigger, about the size of a small dog.  Because the Goliath frog is endangered, the Museum had a mold of the skeleton of this huge frog that is the size of a small baby!

     The exhibit had a virtual frog dissection screen where a person could dissect a frog and see its internal organs. Using this tool, third-graders learned that frogs don’t have a rib cage. There were also screens around the room with facts about the different frogs, such as how they live in the wild, what they eat, and what they look like as tadpoles.

     This was an important exhibit because the third-graders learned about frogs in science this year.


*****

     At the Science Museum, there was a hatching chick exhibit. The students watched the workers clean the cage. It looked like an aquarium, but had two sections. One was the egg section and one was for the already hatched eggs (the chicks).

     The students watched the workers empty some of the hatched chicks into the other section. The workers also “watered” the eggs. All they did to “water” the eggs was take a bottle filled with plain water and spray them. This softens the eggshells, so they will break easier.

      Each egg had a different number written on it so the worked could keep track of how many hatched each day.

      Next time you go to the Science Museum, be sure to “chick” out the chick exhibit!

 

*****
 

    One exhibit at the Science Museum was called “Virtual Fish Tank.”  The Virtual Fish Tank is a machine that allows a person to create fish.

    In the room, there are three screens about the size of a computer screen.  On the screens, a person can design fish. Two characteristics to be picked are how hungry it is and its personality (for example, is it nice or shy?).

    After picking the fish’s name, by clicking the “release” button, the fish goes through a tube and swims onto the big screen that is the fish tank.

    After the fish is in the tank, a person can turn a wheel that feeds it. It is important to think about the fish’s personality, because it can get eaten by some of the other fish in the tank, if you’re not careful.

 

*****

 

     There is a science playground in the Museum of Science.

     When people first walk into the room, they will see a red light zooming across the wall. This is a light you can race with a friend.

     There is a swing that counts how many seconds it takes a person to swing 10 times.

     There is weight seesaw where one person sits on one side and another sits on the other side and then the people try to equal the weight.

     There is a rope that goes stiff to wiggly to let people climb, a bicycle wheel that people can spin, and a place where you can race your friend with your own bouncy ball.

     Also there is a metal round spot on the floor with a handle bar that people can stand on and spin and get dizzy.

 
*****

     Another interactive exhibit was the musical staircase.  It is a tall, wide staircase inside the Museum near the cafeteria that makes sounds when it’s  stepped on.  Some of the sounds include musical notes and beeps and bells.

     (Story reported and written by Alexis C., Timmy C., Meagan K., Katherine L., Jie Sen L., Matt M., Kaitlin P., Christine S., and Isabella V.)
      (For information about the Museum of Science and its exhibits, go to http://www.mos.org/.) 
--June 11, 2009--
 
 

 
 
 
kinder2.jpg
Cunniff School kindergartners pose following their tour of the Watertown Fire Department. 
 

The future is safe 

Cunniff kindergartners patrol police, fire stations 


By DYANNE B., SAM C., SEAN L., TJ P., and GIULIA S.
Cunniff Kids News staff reporters

     The Cunniff kindergarten classes of DiDomenico, Fitzpakinder3.jpgtrick, and Tanguay went on a bus to the Watertown police station and fire station May 22.  
     Ms. Tanguay’s class went to the fire station first. The other students went to the police station first.  
     The students went inside the police station and saw the controls.  The police had a computer that showed the jail cells. That way the police officers could watch the people and make sure they couldn’t get out.
     The students went upstairs and also saw some special handcuffs.
     Mr. P (substitute teacher Jeff Pugliese) had the opportunity to get in the jail cell, but the police let him go afterward. The jail cell has a toilet inside.
     The police have motorcycles and cars.
     In the fire station, the students saw the fire trucks and a ladder truck. They saw how high the ladder could go. The firefighters had a real emergency and the students saw the captain sliding down the fire pole. Some firemen put on all of their gear and attended the emergency.
     Finally, all of the students got stickers and Frisbees.

kinder1.jpg
Cunniff School kindergartners pose on the steps of the Watertown Police Department. 
 
 
--June 9, 2009-- 

 
 
maypolice1.jpg
    Police Officer Lloyd Burke (second from right, with hard hat) surveys the progress at his future workplace. 
 

On sound footing 

Listen to the progress being made at Watertown Police site  

 

     Boom boom bang. Beep beep beep.
     That is the sound of the new Watertown Police Station being built on Main Street, where the Browne School used to be. The new building will be 40,000 square feet, accordingmaypolice2.jpg to Officer Lloyd Burke, and two stories high. The 75-year-old police station in Watertown Square is too small, he said.
     The new building costs $13 million and will be done next spring, if there aren’t any problems.
      “Boom boom bang’’ is the sound of cranes working outside, lifting and carrying cement drain pipes.
      “Beep beep beep’’ is the sound of machines backing up and warning people. The site is so loud, people have to yell to talk.
     You can see right through the building. The skeleton of the building is done, as well as the basement. In the basement will be men’s and women’s locker rooms, a shooting range,


  maypolice4.jpg
maypolice6.jpg
 










 


maypolice3.jpg









The future entrance of the future home of the Watertown Police (left); the roll  call room (top left); sometimes, on your birthday, riding a pony just won't do. 

    



a workout room, and a storage room.
     On the first floor, there will be the lobby, community center, jail, and, in the back, a garage.
     On the second floor, there will be the captain’s and cmaypolice5.jpghief’s offices and a mechanical room for heating and air conditioning equipment.
     Outside the building it’s as muddy as ever. There are big piles of rocks. There is lots of metal and floor decking. There are also two wells 1,500 feet deep. The geothermal wells, according to Officer Burke, will use the free-flowing heated water to save money for heating and air conditioning.
    “I’m not a science teacher,’’ he said, “I just play one on TV.”
     Fred Hastings is an excavator. He works from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
    “I love my job,’’ he said. “It’s exciting. It’s something different every day.”
    (Story reported and written by Cunniff Kids News staff reporters Domenic M., Shannon M., Patrick W., Alexis C., Timmy C., Owen G., Meagan K., Katherine L., Matt M., Tia P., Beth P., Christine S., Renee S., Isabella V., Mairead W., Jack L., Rose M., Renee T., Dyanne B., Sam C., and TJ P.)
    (For more information about the new police station, to see other pictures of the site, and to watch video taken during the demolition and construction process, go to http://www.watertownpd.org/new_station/cons_update.html.) 
 
maypolice7.jpg
Reporters from the Cunniff Kids News and Officer Lloyd Burke (second from right, with hard hat) pose near one of the many machines at the site of the new Watertown Police Station, which is scheduled to open in Spring 2010.
 
--May 6, 2009-- 
   
 
 
comicstop.jpg
Reporters from the Cunniff Kids News meet with Dave Philbrick (second from left), owner of  The Comic Stop, among the racks of his Watertown store. 
 

Super, in many ways 

The Comic Stop prepares for Free Comic Book Day 

 

     

By CHARLOTTE V., PATRICK W., KATHERINE L.,
ISABELLA V., and MAIREAD W.

Cunniff Kids News staff reporters

 

     Except for the ceiling and floor, every square inch is covered with comics. Candy, trading cards, and action figures are on display.
     Welcome to The Comic Stop.
     The store, which opened in 1996, is located on Main Street across from the Watertown Public Library. It is owned and run by Dave Philbrick, who has lived in Watertown for 20 years.
     Philbrick was an English major in college and a teacher at Martin Luther King School in Cambridge, but he wanted to run his own business.FCBD_cymk_date1.jpg
     “I like my job,” he said. “I think working for yourself can be fun.’’
     The Comic Stop is open every day except Sunday,usually from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Philbrick works there every day, but his one employee, Jeremy, works on Saturday.
      “I think you have to be motivated because there’s no boss to tell you what to do,’’ Philbrick said.
      The books come in two formats, single comics and collections, called graphic novels. X-Men, Spider-Man, Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman are the most popular titles.
      Philbrick organizes the books on the shelves that line the wall by smaller companies, then DC and Marvel, the two biggest publishers of comics.

      He gets new comics on Wednesdays and puts them on specific shelves, then moves older comics to other shelves. He keeps up to six months’ worth of a comic, and he sells some of the more expensive ones on eBay.

      In the back room, some older comics are displayed in glass cases. The comics are from the 1960s and ‘70s, when comics sold for 12 cents. Now, he says, the average comic sells for $3 or $4.

     But on the first Saturday of May, comic books will cost zero dollars.bongo.jpg

     Free Comic Book Day, which started in 2001, is a day when comic book stores across the nation give away comics. This year, Free Comic Book Day is May 2.
     The particulars vary from store to store, but The Comic Stop will have food, a sketch artist, and “Star Wars” characters. The Comic Stop has a limit of five free comics for each person.

     Free Comic Book Day is usually tied to a movie that is coming out, and this year’s movie is “X-Men Origins: Wolverine.”

     “In the past, people have dressed up as comic book characters,” Philbrick said. “Feel free to dress up.”

     The Comic Stop also sells trading cards, including Yu-Gi-Oh!, Pokemon, and Magic. Pokemon is the best-seller, but one Friday a month Philbrick runs a Magic tournament where he serves pizza.

     Kids, parents, and teens go to The Comic Stop.

     “Every Wednesday, a lot of the same customers come in,’’ said Philbrick. “A lot of customers are in their 30s, 40s, and 50s. They’re old -- like me.”

     Surprisingly, Philbrick doesn’t read most of the comics he sells.

     “I still enjoy them, but I don’t read as many as I used to,” Philbrick said. “I tend to collect them more than I read.”

     (The Comic Stop is located at 134A Main St., Watertown, Mass. For more information, go to http://thecomicstop.com/. For more information about Free Comic Book Day, Saturday, May 2, 2009, go to http://www.freecomicbookday.com/index.asp.)
 
--April 25, 2009--

 

 

 
 
charlesbridge.jpg
Reporters from the Cunniff Kids News met with (left to right) Whitney, Lynne, and Taylor in the offices of Charlesbridge Publishing in Watertown Square. 
 

The story about the stories

Charlesbridge brings books to life in Watertown

 

     The Mr. Potato Heads sat on the bookcase shelf, next to all of the books ever published by Charlesbridge Publishing.

     The company started in 1980, publishing text books. Now they publish all kinds of books, including kids’ picture books, books for babies, nature and science books, and chapter books. There are about 30 people who work at Charlesbridge Publishing in third-floor offices in Watertown Square across from the fire station.

     Taylor, who works in marketing, said, “The first books were textbooks, but we got bored of that, so we started publishing picture books [in 1989].”

     The first picture book they published was The Icky Bug Alphabet Book, illustrated by the Icky Bug Man, Ralph Masiello. That book is in the bookcase with the Mr. Potato Heads in the editorial library. The company has made about 400 books since it started.

     Charlesbridge publishes books twice a year -- in the “spring” (Feb. 1) and the “fall” (July 1). It makes about 30 books a year. The amount of copies depends on the book. Sometimes it makes 10,000, 7,500, or 5,000 copies. Sometimes the book is made in paperback and hard cover at the same time.

     Lynne works in editorial. She said the editors are the first people to work with authors. Editorial is in charge of fact checking.

     “We especially do it for science books,’’ said Lynne. “Part of our job is to make sure that everything is correct.’’

     The editors work closely with the design department. Whitney, who works in design, said design organizes pages and works with the illustrators. When the book is ready, the sales and marketing department makes sure the public knows about the books. 

     Not just one person at Charlesbridge decides to make a book. A team meeting with all of the editors and designers picks the books.

    About 200 pieces a month come from authors who want Charlesbridge to read and publish their stories. They go into a “slush pile.”

     “Sometimes there are stories and authors that are really, really good,’’ said Lynne.Humpty2.jpg 

     “What REALLY happened to Humpty’’ was a typewritten story by Jeanie Franz Ransom that came into the slush pile in 2003. “Humpty” went back and forth with the author four times. It took six years to publish. Each project is different, Lynne said, but the average time for a book to be published is three years.

     “Humpty” is a funny story about Humpty Dumpty, so Charlesbridge wanted drawings that fit the story. Whitney said design has its own slush pile and it has a file with pictures. She said design tries to match the story with the illustrator.

     “We said, ‘Who is a funny illustrator?’ That's how we found Stephen Axelsen,” said Whitney. “We sent him the story and he said, ‘It could be like a comic book.’

     “He sent character sketches and he had a good idea of what it would look like.”
     Whitney said design determines where words and art will go on each page. Design has to also pick a font for the cover and the words inside. A font is what the letters look like.

     Whitney said design works with the illustrator. The artist sends along a first set of drawings and then a second set, and then sends “final art,” which is scanned onto computers and sent to Singapore. Many of Charlesbridge’s books are printed in China.

     Taylor said one year before the book is ready, marketing sits down and makes a plan.

     “We get it to the bookstores and tell people about it,’’ Taylor said.

     Book are sent out for reviews to newspapers and magazines, and authors do interviews on talk shows, like “Oprah,’” and news shows, like  “The Today Show.’’

     Books are sold to bookstores, schools, museum gift shops, parents, teachers, schools, and libraries. Marketing also makes posters, T-shirts, bookmarks, and catalogues.

     Whitney, Taylor, and Lynne had a hard time picking a favorite Charlesbridge book. Taylor and Whitney had the same favorite new book, “Unite or Die,” which is about the Constitution.

     “It's drawn as a play and it has really funny drawings,’’ said Whitney. “And it has information about history, which is my favorite subject.’’
     (Story reported and written by Cunniff Kids News staff reporters Charlotte V., Shannon M., Caroline D., Owen G., Jie Sen L., Tia P., Beth P., Christine S., Renee S., Isabella V., Shay D., Julia F., Mairead W., Ryan L., Rose M., Dyanne B., Sam C., Jia Yi L., and TJ P.)
     (For information about Charlesbridge Publishing and its titles, go to www.charlesbridge.com.)

--April 3, 2009--

 


 

Watertown Police Officer Lloyd Burke (center) surveys the progress at his future workplace.

In on the bottom floor

Watertown’s new police station takes shape


     Right now, it’s a big hole with men working on concrete walls. Soon, it’s going to be the Watertown police station.
     The site is on Main Street, next to the historic Browne House, which was built in 1698.  The Watertown Police Department will move in to the new building in the spring of 2010.
     The current police station was built in the 1930s and is too small, said Officer Lloyd Burke.
     “I’m very, very excited,” he said. “Right now, I have to share my office with two other people and it’s cramped.”
     He says that the new station will be approximately 40,000 square feet, which is four times bigger.
     When Burke is on the site, he stays safe by wearing a hardhat, which is harder and stronger than a bike helmet. He takes pictures of the site every day, he said, “so we have a historical record of what it looked like.” He puts them on a police department website, which also has pictures of the demolition and drawings of what the new station will look like when it is done.
     The site was where the Browne School and playground used to be.  It is now so muddy, people can lose their shoes.
     Trucks are always going in and out of the site. There are construction machines, like a front-end loader, parked near the big hole. There are trees wrapped with pink ribbons, which means they will be saved. Next to the trees is a big steel box used by workers digging a trench that helps keep the trench from collapsing on them. On the edge of the hole is a laser level. Inside the hole are cement walls with rebar and wooden forms for more walls. But it is so surprisingly quiet on the site, you could read there.
     The baseball field behind the site will not be touched. The only other thing not knocked down was the flag pole, but it is surrounded by piles of dirt and rocks. The piles are not as tall as the flagpole, but they are much bigger than the white construction trailer by the street.  
     The piles came from the hole. The rocks were sifted out of the dirt. A lot of the dirt will be filled in around the foundation. Some of the rocks will be will be trucked away and some will be sold for big money to people who want to use them for stone walls.
     Some parts of the school were saved. The sandstone blocks that read “Browne School” and some transoms from over the doors will be put in the new station. The new station will be twice as big. It will have a community room on the first floor and a shooting range in the basement. 
     There is a truck now in the basement where the changing room will be. The truck uses a ramp made out of dirt used to get in and out of the hole.
     The walls are made by pouring concrete over rebar (short for “reinforcing bar”), which is made of steel and help the concrete stay together so it won’t crack.
     One of the people putting the rebar together is Mike. He is an ironworker from Boston Local 7. He lives in Millbury, which is near Worcester, and has to travel to Watertown Monday through Friday. He works from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day, unless he has to stay longer because they are pouring concrete.
     Mike wears his tools -- wire and pliers -- on his belt.
     “These are the only tools I need to do my job,” he said.
     He was working on the foundation, which, he said, is the most important part of the building.
     “Without a solid foundation, you might have problems later on,’’ he said.
     When work first began at the site, protesters came with a large inflatable rat. They were mad, said Burke, because the workers doing the demolition were from New Hampshire.
     The protesters are gone now, but the building continues.
     (Story reported and written by Cunniff Kids News staff reporters Owen G., Meagan K., Jie Sen L., Tia P., Renee S., Isabella V., Julia F., Ryan L. ,and Jia Yi L.)
     (For more information about the new police station, to see other pictures of the site, and to watch video taken during the demolition and construction process, go to http://www.watertownpd.org/new_station/cons_update.html.) 
   
     Watertown Police Officer Lloyd Burke (center) and Cunniff Kids News reporters at the construction trailer.
 
 
   --Nov. 12, 2008--
 
 
 
 
 Mrs. Munger's class (above) and Mrs. DiMascio's class (below) at the Gore Place dig site. 

 

Digging the scene at Gore Place     

 

By TIA P. and BETH P.

Cunniff Kids News staff reporters

     The third-graders of the Cunniff School went to Gore Place in Waltham on Oct. 21.

     The people who run Gore Place want to move the Carriage House to its original spot. The Carriage House had been moved years ago because the city wanted to build a street.

     The archeologists, who are college students, working at Gore Place have found lots of artifacts, like glass, marble, and animal bones.

     When they are digging, every different level of dirt is a different color.

     One of the archeologists, Tom, found a spine of a cow at 9:34 a.m. on Oct. 21. Unfortunately, the students could not stay and had to go back to school.
     (To learn more about Gore Place, go to http://www.goreplace.org/.)
 



vBulletin stat

Bottom Divider

My TeacherWeb
©2014 TeacherWeb, Inc.