UNIT 2 Announcements (Ancient Greece)

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it."
-- Aristotle

"The test of a first rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function."
-- F. Scott Fitzgerald




UNIT 2 ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE COMPLETE.  PLEASE GO TO UNIT 3 ANNOUNCEMENTS.



ANNOUNCEMENTS 12/6/13

ON THE DEATH OF NELSON MANDELA
"No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite."
--Nelson Mandela from his autobiography, "Long Walk to Freedom," 1994

"J'ai été touché d'apprendre que toutes les cloches de Taizé avaient sonné le jour de ma libération de prison." ["I was touched to learn that all the bells of Taizé had rang out the day of my liberation from prison."]  -- Nelson Mandela, 1995

Harper Lee in To Kill a Mockingbird on the topic of courage:  "I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It's when you know you're licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what."

Facebook post from Mrs. Bates' friend in Nairobi, Kenya: "R.I.P Madiba, the greatest. Amandlha Awethu." [Google it.]

News program with clips from public statements and speeches as well as a retrospective on Nelson Mandela's life and legacy from the PBS News Hour: http://video.pbs.org/video/2365134709/  Includes interviews with some who knew him well and some reflections on his influence.

A short CNN article on specific ways Nelson Mandela influenced America:
http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/06/us/mandela-american-impact/index.html?hpt=hp_c2





ANNOUNCEMENTS 12/5/13

TEST STAPLED PAPER PACKETS: PLEASE HELP!
If you have not yet made your contribution of four stapled packets of paper (3 to 4 pages each), please bring them to the upper auditorium tomorrow. We are counting on you. Please have them stapled and ready to go! There will be boxes provided and you can put your paper packets in them as you enter.


TEST PREPARATION Q&A
Q: How should I prepare for the multiple choice portion of the test?
A: Your most important test preparation resource is the study guide. It is under Unit 2 Handouts. We try very hard not to include anything on the test that is not mentioned on the study guide. The art and architecture Powerpoint (long version) is in three parts on ePark. Ms. Bates just posted a test review Powerpoint on ePark this afternoon that is shorter and focuses on the main ideas you should review for the test. If you missed the How Art Made the World film, the most important part about the Greek sculptures can be found here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88gXWW3qN7o. Don't forget you are responsible for reading the Ancient Greece chapter in the Creative Impulse book on your own.

Q: How should I prepare for the essay portion of the test?
A: See the exact wording of the essay prompt below. We will give you the topics for the two body paragraphs. To prepare, the most important thing is to write a topic sentence for each paragraph that makes sense and has some commentary (explanation, opinion, or point of view) to guide your paragraph. Ms. Bates' class brainstormed some topic sentences today and they have been posted under Unit 2 Handouts [Be warned: She did not have time to edit it.]. Once you have a clear focus for your topic sentence, work on giving as much detail in your CD as possible. For art and architecture, be able to describe every relevant detail of the work. For literature, be able to describe, in detail, what the character said and what the character did. In your CM, use phrases like "This shows that..." and "because" to explain your CDs. If necessary, write all your CD first so it is on the page. Then you can talk about it after. That's not the most elegant method, but you should try to maximize your CD points, and this might be the easiest way to do it if you had difficulty writing CD on your last essay test. Get it all down on the page first!

Here's the full essay prompt:


Write your essay on the paper provided. Please write in pen and only write on one side of each page. Please do not write in the margins so your teacher can write comments there. Start your second body paragraph on a new page. Indent paragraphs. If you run out of space, raise your hand and we will supply you with extra paper. Remember, you are welcome to use a page of your packet for brainstorming and organizing.


Your teachers have provided the thesis for this essay. Copy it directly to your paper.


There are two body paragraphs in the essay. In each body paragraph, you must use the topic sentence (TS) provided and complete it with your own ideas. Then, use specific examples from the literature and art you have studied in Humanities this marking period to support your topic sentence (TS). Be sure to correctly identify pieces of art & literature by title, period and/or creator. Be sure, also, that you clearly connect the information in your examples to your thesis. Each body paragraph is worth 40 points.


Write a one-sentence conclusion at the end of the essay. This sentence will serve the function of a conclusion paragraph and is worth 2 points.


Information from the objective test used in your essay will not be given credit.


THESIS: In all aspects of their culture, the Greeks explore the ideal, which sometimes includes the use of illusion and/or flaw.


TOPIC SENTENCE #1: [Topic to be determined] demonstrates the ideal in Ancient Greece because...


TOPIC SENTENCE #2: [Topic to be determined] demonstrates the ideal in Ancient Greece because...


CONCLUSION: Write a one sentence conclusion at the end of this essay.






ANNOUNCEMENTS 11/27/13

HUMANITIES IN THE NEWS: SKEPTICAL OPTIMISM; IS THE WORLD BECOMING A BETTER PLACE?
Check out this thought-provoking clip: http://on.aol.com/show/the-future-starts-here-517951318/episode/517752968. The clip gives reaons why optimism with a healthy dose of skepticism is the best orientation to take when considering the world today and the bad and good things happening in it. The speaker argues that the world is actually getting better. She cites the book The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined by Steven Pinker, in which Pinker describes five major historical forces for peace:
The Leviathan (the state; reigns in internal violence)
Gentle Commerce (economic incentives for cooperation)
Feminization (empowerment of women; men are naturally more violent)
The Expanding Circle (empathy; sympathizing with ever wider classes)
The Escalator of Reason (rationality; application of empathy)


CALENDAR
A new version of the calendar was posted yesterday to show the updates shown in the 11/21 announcements.


TEST 2 STUDY GUIDE
The test two study guide is updated for this year and is now available under Unit 2 Handouts.


HUMANITIES IN THE NEWS: SCIENCE AND TECH HELP CORRECT MISTAKEN IDEAS ABOUT THE ORIGINS OF THE STONES AT STONEHENGE
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/26/stonehenge-inner-stones-origins-wales_n_4325591.html





ANNOUNCEMENTS 11/21/13

URGENT! PLEASE RETURN LORD OF THE FLIES BOOKS TOMORROW!
Other teachers desperately need copies of Lord of the Flies. Please return your copy of the book ASAP!
CALENDAR ADJUSTMENTS
A new copy of the calendar for the rest of this unit is posted under the calendar tab on this website. There are quite a few changes from now until the end of Unit 2, but after that the Unit 3 calendar is not changed. Please note the due dates for homework!





ANNOUNCEMENTS 11/20/13

URGENT! PLEASE RETURN LORD OF THE FLIES BOOKS TOMORROW!
Other teachers desperately need copies of Lord of the Flies. Please return your copy of the book ASAP!


LARGE GROUP LOCATION TOMORROW (THURSDAY): MR. READ'S ROOM
The location of large group tomorrow has been changed due to the water damage in the Salem auditorium. We were not able to get the presentation room in the library, so we will be meeting in Mr. Read's classroom, 1223. See details in yesterday's announcement.


DUE DATE FOR STUDY GUIDE FOR PBS NOVA PARTHENON EPISODE
The study guide for the Parthenon film homework has been changed from tomorrow (Thursday) to Friday, 11/22. The film is about 53 minutes long, so please plan enough time to view it. We recommend you fill in the study guide as you are watching. The film is available here: http://video.pbs.org/video/980040228. The study guide is under Unit 2 Handouts.





ANNOUNCEMENTS 11/19/13

LOCATION OF LARGE GROUP WEDNESDAY: MR. READ'S ROOM (1223)
The location of large group tomorrow has been changed due to the water damage in the Salem auditorium. We were not able to get the presentation room in the library, so we will be meeting in Mr. Read's classroom, 1223. It is on the first floor of Salem all the way down at the end of the side hallway with the Egyptian mural. The Egyptian hallway is a couple of doors down from the book room. Please arrive early so we can arrange seating. Bring a pillow, blanket, or fluffy coat to sit on!





ANNOUNCEMENTS 11/18/13

ART AND ESSAY CONTEST

Canton Commission For Culture, Arts, & Heritage To Hold Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Student Art and Essay Contests (Canton, MI - November 12, 2013): The Canton Commission for Culture Arts and Heritage's Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Sub-Committee invites all K-12 students in Plymouth, MI and Canton, MI to participate in its upcoming 2014 Celebration of the Life and Legacy of Dr. King by entering a special art and essay contest.


Students are asked to submit original artwork (paintings, drawings, photography, sculpture, etc.) and/or essays that demonstrate their knowledge of the life and times of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s life, as well as his "Dream." Participants are encouraged to creatively express the impact Dr. King has had on his/her life, community, country, and the world as a whole through their artwork and/or with written words.


Winners will be selected in three art and essay categories, including: elementary, junior high and high school levels. Cash prizes and other awards will be present to the six winners during Canton Celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on Monday, January 20, 2014 at The Village Theater at Cherry Hill, located at 50400 Cherry Hill Road. In addition to the winners, other selected submissions will be displayed at The Village Theater during the event. All entries become the property of Canton Township and will not be returned.


Art work must be mounted on poster board and be no larger than 11" x 17" and no smaller than 8 1â�"2" x 11". Three dimensional work should be limited to 50 pounds and three feet in diameter and/or height.


Both artwork and essays must be submitted by Friday, December 20, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. All submissions (both art and essays) must include: the name of the artist, address, phone number, email, school and grade. Artwork should be delivered to the attention of Jon LaFever at the Summit on the Park Front Desk, 46000 Summit Parkway, Canton, MI 48188, weekdays between the hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m.


Essays can be emailed to villagetheater@canton-mi.org or mailed to The Village Theater at Cherry Hill, 50400 Cherry Hill Road, Canton, MI 48187.


The Canton Commission for Culture Arts and Heritage's Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Sub- Committee is still seeking sponsors to help provide prizes and gifts for the students who participate in the 2014 Canton Celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Individuals and businesses are asked to contact Anthony Davis at 313/300-2994 to submit donations.


The Canton Commission for Culture, Arts, and Heritage meets the second Monday quarterly (February/May/August/November) at 7 p.m. in the Canton Township Administration Building. For more information on this commission, visit canton-mi.org or email culturalcommission@canton-mi.org.






ANNOUNCEMENTS 11/12/13

ALL STUDENTS: REVISED ILIAD STUDY GUIDE DUE DATES
Lang students only:
Wednesday, 11/13: Iliad Book IX (9) study guide due
Monday, 11/18: Iliad Book XXII (22) study guide due
Tuesday, 11/19: Iliad Book XXIV (24) study guide due

Bates and Read students only:
Friday, 11/15: Iliad Book IX (9) study guide due
Monday, 11/18: Iliad Book XXII (22) study guide due
Tuesday, 11/19: Iliad Book XXIV (24) study guide due


PLEASE READ: ACHILLES IN VIETNAM
http://www.achillesinvietnam.com/about/


CHARACTER PROJECT RESEARCH
If you have not been doing research on your character project, you need to start. You will need to have a minimum of 100 note cards about every aspect of your character's life and his or her daily life. By now, you should have at least one print source that you feel confident is an expert source. The major events and conditions of your character's time are also relevant and important. Next week, we will have a large group about how to write the costume research document, which is due on 12/10. You may wish to start collecting information on your character's clothing, shoes, jewelry, headwear, and undergarments now in preparation for that assignment. That way you can ask questions next week if you come across any challenges. Hint: Don't forget children's books can be excellent resources if published by an expert source. Daily life information is often especially well-documented in children's books.





ANNOUNCEMENTS 11/8/13

LOCAL MUSIC LOG OPPORTUNITY
World premiere of a new Scottish Bagpipe Concerto, with piper Nancy Tunnicliffe fresh off a performance with the Boston Pops and the Michigan Philharmonic. Date: Sunday, 11/17, 2pm. Location: Plymouth First United Methodist Church. Here is the article:
http://www.hometownlife.com/article/20131103/NEWS15/311030061/Orchestra-plays-Plymouth-church





ANNOUNCEMENTS 11/2/13

HUMANITIES IN THE NEWS: THE BONES OF CLEOPATRA'S MURDERED HALF SISTER?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/26/cleopatra-half-sister-bones-murdered_n_2766739.html



HUMANITIES IN THE NEWS: RAMSES III

Check out this facsinating new information about Ramses III

http://m.bbc.co.uk/news/health-20755264






ANNOUNCEMENTS 10/25/13

OEDIPUS PLAY HOMEWORK
Great job on the Oedipus play, everyone! We hope you had fun while learning. That's always the best way! For Monday, please write up a brief list of what you did for the play, with whom you did it, and how much time you spent. Be specific about your jobs and/or roles. Directors, be prepared to give some positive feedback to your group and single out the students who went above and beyond in their efforts.


ALL STUDENTS: BRING TO CLASS ON MONDAY
Please bring a yellow highlighter to class on Monday. Yes, it must be yellow (not orange, pink, blue, green, etc.). If you don't have one, please borrow one from a friend just for fifth hour on Monday. Thank you.


BATES STUDENTS: ADDITIONAL MONDAY HOMEWORK
Bates students, this is extremely important! Please bring your Story of Ra, Story of Enkidu, and Genesis study guides to class on Monday. Please also bring your yellow literature comparison/contrast grid.


REMINDER: TEN NOTE CARDS DUE THURSDAY, 10/31
Carefully review this information from the calendar:
10 note cards: 1 source card and 9 info cards
in a plastic baggy
no paper clips
last name on back of each card and in Sharpie on the baggy
source must be a PRINT source

Please note that these ten note cards can be on any type of information -- daily life, your character's biography, clothing, the general time period -- as long as the information is relevant to your character. Be careful to follow the correct format (see handouts below).

See the RESEARCH RESOURCES FOR BOTH SEMESTERS tab on this website for the following documents to help you make note cards:


ATTENTION! GET ALL YOUR LOGS DONE AT ONE TIME!
Honors Modern Literature and the Arts is hosting a field trip to Chicago; it is leaving on Thursday, November 7th, and returning on Sunday, November 10th. It is a wonderful experience, exposing students to current artists in the fine arts, sculpture, dance and theater. Mr. Read is one of the teachers and is looking for responsible, creative individuals who would like to see what is currently being done in the art world.

You could get all your first semester logs completed on your trip as well as additional experiences that could count for second semester's logs.

The trip will cost students $315 for room and transportation and an additional $150 will be needed for spending and food money. If anyone is interested, they can Mrs. Bates's room or Mr. Read's room to pick up the paperwork. Questions? Contact Mr. Read at brian.read@pccsmail.net.


SOME ADVICE FOR THE GREECE UNIT
The Iliad is one of the most moving, loving, violent, intriguing, and enchanting stories of all time. You will NOT get the same experience from reading summaries in Spark Notes or any other "dumbed down" translation. Of course, feel free to use Spark Notes as a companion to your reading, if you would like to use them. Please be aware that the language and poetry of The Iliad is a big part of the experience, but, just like Shakespeare, it takes some time to get used to it. You will need to slow down and take your time to read.

The study guide for Book I of The Iliad is due Monday, 11/4. It is designed to help you with your reading. Use it a like a scavenger hunt and follow the hints for line numbers. Sometimes the reading guide will help you identify whole pages that you can read through quickly. Other times, you will need to slow down and read a passage carefully multiple times in order to catch the true meaning.

Students report it takes about four hours to read the first book and fill in the study guide. To be successful, you could do about a half hour of Iliad reading daily for the next eight days (or divide up the time however you wish). Please do not put yourself in a situation where you have to skim the reading and copy the answers to the study guide at the last minute.

After completing Book I, students also report that the later books go more quickly, although they still take 90 minutes to three hours. You will not regret putting some time into a careful reading of this story. It's the highlight of the year!

Scenes from The Iliad have inspired artists for millenia. Below are a variety of works depicting the great, proud King Priam of Troy begging and weeping at Achilles' knee. Achilles is the vicious warrior on the Greek side responsible for the death of King Priam's favorite son, Prince Hektor. Priam is begging for his son's dead body to be returned for a proper burial. Will Achilles callously deny him, or will Achilles join King Priam in his weeping and return the body to him with kindness? What can you guess from these depictions?


Priam Asking Achilles for the Body of His Son by Jerome Martin Langlois, 1809