UNIT 2 Announcements (Ancient Greece)

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it."
-- Aristotle

"The test of a first rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function."
-- F. Scott Fitzgerald




ANNOUNCEMENTS 10/24/14

HURRY TO REGISTER! ALICE WALKER WILL BE SPEAKING IN ANN ARBOR!
A free and fantastic lecture log opportunity is coming to Ann Arbor:

Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner, author of the critically acclaimed book The Color Purple, and social activist Alice Walker will deliver this year's Zora Neale Hurston Lecture at the University of Michigan on Wednesday, Nov. 5, from 5:30 to 7 p.m.

The annual lecture, presented by the University of Michigan Department of Afroamerican and African Studies and the U-M Center for the Education of Women, will take place at Hill Auditorium, located at 825 N. University Ave.

Walker's lecture will explore social justice issues from her womanist and black feminist perspective, reflecting on the complementary missions of DAAS and CEW.

The annual lecture honors Hurston, who is widely regarded as the most prolific African-American woman writer of her time.

"She brought to life the power, richness and complexity of black cultures for many readers," the CEW wrote in a news release.

The lecture - which will be close the CEW's 50th anniversary celebration - is free and open to the public, but registration for the event is required. Attendees can register here, and seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

Registration site: http://www.cew.umich.edu/progevents/alice-walker-presented-department-afroamerican-and-african-studies-and-center-education-w


HAPPY DIWALI!
Do you know what Diwali is? It's an important celebration for Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, and Muslims. It is pronounced Divali, and it is also known as the "Festival of Lights." Here is a Diwali message from our president, where he shares a few details about how the holiday is celebrated and wishes those who celebrate, "Saal Mubarak" ("Happy New Year").
http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2014/10/22/president-obama-extends-warmest-wishes-diwali





ANNOUNCEMENTS 10/14/14


CALENDAR CORRECTION

The "What is good/true/beautiful?" paper is due Thursday, not Wednesday. There was an error on the calendar, and it has now been corrected. See instructions under Unit 2 Handouts.



MAKE-UP TESTS
Make-ups for the Unit 1 test will be this Thursday (10/16) after school in Mr. Read's room. Please be ready!



CURRENT CALENDAR: UNIT 2 ANCIENT GREECE

The full semester calendar is now available under the Current Calendar tab. There is a Word and PDF version. Take a close look at upcoming due dates and plan ahead!



TONIGHT! AWESOME FILM OR LECTURE LOG (FREE AND LOCAL! 10/10 QUALITY POINTS!)

Detroit's Native Son, a one-hour movie about Yusif Shakur, who metamorphosed from fatherless gang member to community organizer and activist, will be featured at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 14, by Citizens for Peace at Unity of Livonia, 28660 Five Mile Road, Livonia. Following the film, Shakur will respond to audience questions and discuss how he is working to transform his neighborhood from a war zone to a peace zone.

Here's the article:

http://www.hometownlife.com/story/entertainment/movies/2014/10/09/peace-activist-yusef-shakur-speak-livonia/16905997/

Here's the powerful film trailer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tphaRNcaqU8




REMINDER: GREAT THEATRE LOG OPPORTUNITY THIS WEEK! DR. FAUSTUS (10/10 QUALITY POINTS)

We will be studying Dr. Faustus next semester. Dr. Faustus is the origin of the phrase "Faustian bargain." He is a Renaissance doctor who literally sells his soul to the devil to get access to the secrets and mysteries of the unvierse. How do you think that turns out? The EMU Theatre is putting on multiple performances from 10/10 to 10/19.

"I think hell's a fable." -Faustus, "Ay, think so still, till experience change thy mind." -Mephistopheles, Act II

See details here:

http://www.emich.edu/cmta/productions/2014season/faustus.php


HUMANITIES IN THE COMICS
https://24.media.tumblr.com/3ceec81af82b502687f1f7875d838cfd/tumblr_n5hwcicEUy1rsw63so1_500.jpg


HUMANITIES IN THE NEWS: SKEPTICAL OPTIMISM; IS THE WORLD BECOMING A BETTER PLACE?
Check out this thought-provoking clip: http://on.aol.com/show/the-future-starts-here-517951318/episode/517752968. The clip gives reaons why optimism with a healthy dose of skepticism is the best orientation to take when considering the world today and the bad and good things happening in it. The speaker argues that the world is actually getting better. She cites the book The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined by Steven Pinker, in which Pinker describes five major historical forces for peace:
The Leviathan (the state; reigns in internal violence)
Gentle Commerce (economic incentives for cooperation)
Feminization (empowerment of women; presumes men are naturally more violent)
The Expanding Circle (empathy; sympathizing with ever wider classes)
The Escalator of Reason (rationality; application of empathy)


PLEASE READ: ACHILLES IN VIETNAM
http://www.achillesinvietnam.com/about/


CHARACTER PROJECT RESEARCH
If you have not been doing research on your character project, you need to start. You will need to have a minimum of 100 note cards about every aspect of your character's life and his or her daily life. By now, you should have at least one print source that you feel confident is an expert source. The major events and conditions of your character's time are also relevant and important. Your first 10 note cards will be due on Friday, 10/31.

Soon thereafter, we will have a large group about how to write the costume research document, which is due on 12/2. You may wish to start collecting information on your character's clothing, shoes, jewelry, headwear, and undergarments now in preparation for that assignment. That way you can ask questions next week if you come across any challenges. Hint: Don't forget children's books can be excellent resources if published by an expert source. Daily life information is often especially well-documented in children's books!


HUMANITIES IN THE NEWS: THE BONES OF CLEOPATRA'S MURDERED HALF SISTER?
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/26/cleopatra-half-sister-bones-murdered_n_2766739.html



HUMANITIES IN THE NEWS: RAMSES III

Check out this facsinating new information about Ramses III

http://m.bbc.co.uk/news/health-20755264



SOME ADVICE FOR THE GREECE UNIT
The Iliad is one of the most moving, loving, violent, intriguing, and enchanting stories of all time. You will NOT get the same experience from reading summaries in Spark Notes or any other "dumbed down" translation. Of course, feel free to use Spark Notes as a companion to your reading, if you would like to use them. Please be aware that the language and poetry of The Iliad is a big part of the experience, but, just like Shakespeare, it takes some time to get used to it. You will need to slow down and take your time to read.

The study guide for Book I of The Iliad is due Monday, 10/27. It is designed to help you with your reading. Use it a like a scavenger hunt and follow the hints for line numbers. Sometimes the reading guide will help you identify whole pages that you can read through quickly. Other times, you will need to slow down and read a passage carefully multiple times in order to catch the true meaning.

Students report it takes about four hours to read the first book and fill in the study guide. To be successful, you could do about a half hour of Iliad reading daily for the next eight days (or divide up the time however you wish). Please do not put yourself in a situation where you have to skim the reading and copy the answers to the study guide at the last minute.

After completing Book I, students also report that the later books go more quickly, although they still take 90 minutes to three hours. You will not regret putting some time into a careful reading of this story. It's a highlight of the year!

Scenes from The Iliad have inspired artists for millenia. Below are a variety of works depicting the great, proud King Priam of Troy begging and weeping at Achilles' knee. Achilles is the vicious warrior on the Greek side responsible for the death of King Priam's favorite son, Prince Hektor. Priam is begging for his son's dead body to be returned for a proper burial. Will Achilles callously deny him, or will Achilles join King Priam in his weeping and return the body to him with kindness? What can you guess from these depictions?

Of course, as with all great literature, Achilles' response to King Priam speaks to larger universals. How do we treat those who are less powerful than us? What does it say about a more powerful person when he or she treats the weakened or vanquished enemy callously? Are our enemies human?



Priam Asking Achilles for the Body of His Son by Jerome Martin Langlois, 1809